ELN

(redirected from Exceptional Learning Needs)
AcronymDefinition
ELNEjército de Liberación Nacional (National Liberation Army, Colombia)
ELNElectronic Library Network
ELNElectronic Laboratory Notebook
ELNElastin
ELNExplicit Loss Notification
ELNEuropean Laboratory of Nutrients (Netherlands)
ELNEquity Linked Note
ELNEntreprendre en Lorraine Nord (French: Business in North Lorraine)
ELNExceptional Learning Needs
ELNEarthLink Network
ELNExtremely Low Noise
ELNVAXeln (realtime operating system toolkit; Digital Equipment Corp)
ELNEuro Languages Net (resource)
ELNEastern Lichen Network
ELNEnvironmental Librarian's Network
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Regular class teachers have not been adequately prepared to work with students with exceptional learning needs.
7) Programming options, particularly at the high school level, are often inappropriate for students with exceptional learning needs.
GT3K1: Influences of diversity factors on individuals with exceptional learning needs.
GT4K2: Curricular, instructional, and management strategies effective for individuals with exceptional learning needs.
GT4S7: Use information and/or assistive technologies to meet the needs of individuals with exceptional learning needs.
GT6S2: Use advanced oral and written communication tools, including assistive technologies, to enhance the learning experiences of individuals with exceptional learning needs.
GT7K2: Features that distinguish differentiated curriculum from general curricula for individuals with exceptional learning needs.
GT8K2: Uses, limitations, and interpretation of multiple assessments in different domains for identifying individuals with exceptional learning needs, including those from diverse backgrounds.
GT9S1: Assess personal skills and limitations in teaching individuals with exceptional learning needs.
GT10S2: Collaborate with stakeholders outside the school setting who serve individuals with exceptional learning needs and their families.
If students with exceptional learning needs are to excel, they will need the consistency of a coordinated effort in which all school personnel know what is needed, so they can implement the program as expected.
The authors propose that content area teachers are "content specialists" whereas special education teachers are "learning specialists" armed with strategies, modifications, and approaches that will entice, encourage and provide clear instruction for students with exceptional learning needs.
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