EWL

(redirected from Excess Weight Loss)
AcronymDefinition
EWLEast West Line (train simulation; gaming)
EWLExotic Wood Logs (gaming)
EWLEnterprise Wide Login
EWLEmbedded Wireless Labs
EWLEnterprise Work List
EWLEpsilon Wizard Language
EWLEnterprise Wide Licensing
EWLEclipse Word List
EWLEuropean Women's Lobby
EWLExcess Weight Loss
EWLEthernet Wire Line (computer networking)
EWLElectronic Wait List (US VA)
EWLEffective Working Length
EWLEquivalent Working Length
EWLEuropean Waste List
EWLEngineer Work Line
EWLEnterprise-Wide Logistics (US DoD)
EWLElectronic Warfare Laboratory
EWLEarly Warning Line
EWLEuropean Women's League
EWLElectrical Wholesale Limited (UK)
EWLExternal Wavelength Locking (Agilent)
References in periodicals archive ?
Their mean pre-RLSG weight, percent excess weight loss (%EWL) and BMI were compared with post-RLSG at the period of three, six, twelve and twenty-four months.
Omana et al [10] found similar results when studied men undergoing surgery lost weight; the percentage of excess weight loss was 61.
In secondary analyses, a higher percent of excess weight loss at recent follow-up was significantly associated with an easing of psoriasis severity (59.
It's usually not a major medical concern, but there are cases where diarrhea can cause dehydration and excess weight loss and, on rare occasion, it could be a sign of a more serious problem.
Bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) resulted in a mean percentage excess weight loss of 67.
The trial was designed to detect the difference in excess weight loss between patients who received IGS therapy and a placebo group who did not.
NASDAQ: ETRM), a developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases and other gastrointestinal disorders, has released analyses of the ReCharge Study demonstrating excess weight loss of 34% and significant improvements in obesity-related risk factors for vBloc Therapy treated, moderately obese patients who had at least one comorbidity, the company said on Tuesday.
Meanwhile, a 2012 meta-analysis looking at ethnic differences in weight loss and diabetes remission after bariatric surgery found that for the percentage of excess weight loss, bariatric surgery was more effective in whites than in blacks, regardless of procedure type.
Dallal reported that after a mean follow-up period of 665 days, the mean excess weight loss among all patients was 70%, and was significantly different between whites and blacks (72% vs.
Average excess weight loss for this group was 64 percent, compared to 36 percent for lap-band patients.