FALCPA

AcronymDefinition
FALCPAFood Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004
FALCPAFair, Anderson & Langerman - Certified Public Accountants
References in periodicals archive ?
Allergen recalls continue to occur at a high rate despite the increased awareness that followed the implementation of FALCPA. A transient increase in recalls was expected in the years immediately following the January 2006 implementation of FALCPA, but instead, there has been an ongoing increase (Gendel & Zhu, 2013).
The new FALCPA regulation is a great way to illustrate how labeling software can help with compliance.
FALCPA contains no specifications regarding how to list
Currently FALCPA does not require a "may contain" statement or anything similar, such as a shared equipment disclaimer.
The first compromise in FALCPA was to limit labeling to the presence of wheat.
While FALCPA is a great start, people with food sensitivities may face additional concerns.
The Food and Drug Administration's Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA) now requires food manufacturers to disclose in plain language whether products contain any of the top eight food allergens, which are milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, peanuts (a legume), tree nuts, wheat and soy.
Gluten is one of the eight allergens now required to be disclosed on food packaging following enactment of FALCPA (www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/wh-alrgy.html), the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004.
Under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA), manufacturers are required to identify in plain English the presence of ingredients that contain protein derived from milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, or soybeans in the list of ingredients or to say "contains" followed by name of the source of the food allergen after or adjacent to the list of ingredients.
The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, or FALCPA, applies to foods labeled on or after 1 January 2006.
Although mustard is not one of the top 8 allergens covered by FALCPA in the US, regulations in Canada and many parts of Europe require it to be treated and labeled as an allergen (comparable to the way peanut, milk, egg, etc.
* No labeling requirements with regard to allergens according to the US Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) and EU Directive 2000/13/EC (as amended).