FEFP

AcronymDefinition
FEFPFlorida Education Finance Program
FEFPFuel Element Failure Propagation
References in periodicals archive ?
(37) The FEFP determines how much local and state funding each school
(30) For a complete explanation of the FEFP, see: Florida
Expense to Floridian Taxpayers & Families Expense to Floridian Taxpayers & Families Incentive The state primarily funds public school Funding operations through the Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP), in accordance with schools' full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment counts.
The FEFP prescribes a base per student funding level based on the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) students statewide, varying local property tax bases, program costs and cost differentials among school districts.
The FEFP is primarily funded from a combination of state aid appropriated from the state general revenue funds, and a mandatory millage rate, or the required local effort, established by the state legislature for each school district.
The state of Florida principally finances school districts through its Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP).
Beyond FEFP, funding arrangements for (or against) secondary institutions is negotiated in the inter-institutional articulation agreements.
The district's tentative fiscal 2019 general fund budget of $471 million represents a 10% increase over the prior year's budget and incorporates stable FEFP funding, a modest decrease in students and continued growth in the tax base.
However, FEFP funding levels in recent years have lagged the growth rate in state revenues.
State revenue performance has returned to steady growth, which could benefit FEFP funding levels absent education funding policy changes.
The adopted budget incorporates continued growth in enrollment and FEFP funding, as well as an increased allocation to charter schools and higher costs for salaries and benefits.
The district's fiscal 2018 adopted general fund budget is less than 3% higher than the prior year's budget, reflecting a modest increase in FEFP funding, and a continued rise in instructional costs.