FILMS


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AcronymDefinition
FILMSFunctional Integrated Library Management System
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References in classic literature ?
The change, though it was made without noise, drew back the film from the placid look at the white ceiling, and he looked most affectionately at me.
She sat numb, staring, incapable of anything save seeing the rapid horror before her eyes that flashed along like a moving picture film gone mad.
Overhead, a film of southerly drifting mist draws a theatrical gauze across the firmament.
The stars ahead dim no more than if a film of mist had been drawn under unobserved, but the deep airboom on our skin changes to a joyful shout.
The thought had the same sort of physical discomfort as is caused by a film of mist always coming between the eyes and the printed page.
To build Overbrook into a mammoth production company that will continue to develop high-quality films. Smith's clout and Lassiter's business acumen will be the elements that will help maintain Overbrook's longevity.--Nicole Marie Richardson
Low quality hurt imports, agrees Alfred Teo, chairman of Sigma Plastics Group, Lyndhurst, N.J., a large maker of both specialty and commodity films. He says a dry-cleaning distributor recently imported printed garment bags from China that smelled so strongly of chemicals from solvent-based ink that the bags couldn't be used.
The CPA may consider obtaining historical revenues for films that are in the same genre with similar reviews.
The communique issued by Debord soon after Lebovici's death reads: "Gerard Lebovici having been assassinated, to the applause of a joyful press and a servile public, the films of Guy Debord will never again be projected in France." Three years later, in a letter to Thomas Levin, Debord amended this to: "I should have said: Never again anywhere."
I joined Max Films, Roger Frappier's company, and began work on 2 secondes, the film by Manon Briand.
As the habit of reading continues to decline, especially among the young, history teachers are increasingly confronted by students whose impressions of the past are shaped by the mainstream historical films that Tony Barta has called "the most powerful engine of popular history in our culture." (Barta, 1998, 2) The most prominent of these films are popular, Hollywood-style releases that characteristically sacrifice historical accuracy to the imperatives of emotionally-satisfying narrative resolution and commercial success.
Eating Out is just one of a sudden bounty of gay- and lesbian-themed American films coming soon to theaters near you, ending a multiyear drought that had many GLBT moviegoers latching on to the likes of Finding Nemo and The Lord of the Rings for their queer image satisfaction.