FMEN1

AcronymDefinition
FMEN1Familial Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1
Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
About one in three patients with FMEN1 has gastrin-releasing tumors, called gastrinomas.
The gastrinomas associated with FMEN1 are difficult to cure by surgery, because it is difficult to find the multiple small gastrinomas in the pancreas and small intestine.
The pituitary gland becomes overactive in about one of four persons with FMEN1. This overactivity can usually be traced to a very small, benign tumor in the gland that releases too much prolactin, called a prolactinoma.
Occasionally, a person who has FMEN1 develops islet tumors of the pancreas that secrete high levels of pancreatic hormones other than gastrin.
The overactive endocrine glands associated with FMEN1 may contain benign tumors, but usually they do not have any signs of cancer.
Another type of benign tumor often seen in people with FMEN1 is a plum-sized, fatty tumor called a lipoma, which grows under the skin.
The pituitary gland becomes overactive in about one of six persons with FMEN1. This overactivity can usually be traced to very small, benign tumors in the gland that release too much prolactin (prolactinomas).
Occasionally, a person who has FMEN1 develops tumors of the pancreas that secrete high levels of pancreatic hormones other than gastrin.
An example of a benign tumor that may become quite large in people with FMEN1 is the pituitary tumor called prolactinoma.
Another school advocates early surgery to try to remove pancreatic cancers in FMEN1 before they spread outside the pancreas.
Doctors agree that excessive release of certain hormones (such as gastrin) from pancreatic cancer in FMEN1 needs to be treated, and medications are often effective in blocking the effects of these hormones.
If you have been diagnosed with FMEN1, it is important to get periodic checkups because FMEN1 can affect different glands and, even after treatment, residual tissue can grow back.