FHCRC

(redirected from Family History of Colorectal Cancer)
AcronymDefinition
FHCRCFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (Seattle, WA, USA)
FHCRCFamily History of Colorectal Cancer (gastroenterology)
FHCRCFair Housing Council of Riverside County (Riverside, CA)
References in periodicals archive ?
Other risk factors include a family history of colorectal cancer, changes in the genes, smoking, excessive alcohol intake, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity and obesity.
People under 50 who are diagnosed with colorectal cancer may have a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps.
Experts advise opting for these tests when you turn 45 if you have a family history of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease.
Note: People are considered to be at average risk if they do not have a personal history of colorectal cancer or certain types of polyps, a family history of colorectal cancer, a family history of precancerous colorectal polyps, a personal history of inflammatory bowel disease, a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome (such as Lynch syndrome or familial adenomatous polyposis), or a personal history of radiation treatment to the abdomen or pelvis for a prior cancer.
pylori (+) (n=180) p Age, years 49.1[+ or -]8.2 44.2[+ or -]6.1 0.16 Male sex 77 (50.9%) 68 (37.7%) 0.01 Body mass index <25 kg/m2 22.8[+ or -]5.0 23.1[+ or -]5.3 0.13 Smoking 22 (14.5%) 24 (13.3%) 0.07 Alcohol 18 (11.9%) 20 (11.1%) 0.14 Diabetes 22 (14.5%) 24 (13.3%) 0.42 Hypertension 14 (9.2%) 17 (9.4%) 0.54 Dyslipidemia 19 (12.5%) 21 (11.6%) 0.72 Family history of colorectal cancer 12 (7.9%) 15 (8.3%) 0.27 The chi-square test was used for categorical variables, and the t-test was used for continuous variables Table 2.
"Our research is one of the few studies looking at this relationship and while further analysis in a larger study is needed, it could provide valuable information for those with family history of colorectal cancer and those working on prevention." More than 2.2 million new cases of colorectal cancer, also known as bowel cancer, are expected worldwide by 2030.
Inclusion of at least 250 colonoscopies was accomplished for all indications except for surveillance of patients with a family history of colorectal cancer. We were able to include 96 colonoscopies in this group only.
It is entirely possible for a patient with unidentified Lynch Syndrome to have no family history of colorectal cancer but rather a significant history of endometrial cancer.
Prophylactic colectomy should be considered in those with large colonic polyps burden in whom endoscopic clearance is not possible, in patients with severe gastrointestinal bleeding or diarrhea, and, lastly, if there is a strong family history of colorectal cancer [9].
The risk factors include a family history of inherited colorectal cancer syndromes, a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps at younger than age 60, and a personal history of colorectal cancer or polyps, or chronic inflammatory bowel disease.
African American cases were less likely to report a family history of colorectal cancer (17% versus 27% for Caucasians) and more likely to be current smokers (35% versus 13% for Caucasians).
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