FPPC

(redirected from Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence)
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AcronymDefinition
FPPCFair Political Practices Commission (California)
FPPCFédération Polynésienne de Protection Civile (French: Polynesian Federation of Civil Protection; French Polynesia)
FPPCFieldpoint Petroleum Corporation (stock symbol)
FPPCFormation à la Préservation du Patrimoine Culturel (French: Training in Conservation of Cultural Heritage)
FPPCFive Principles of Peaceful Coexistence
FPPCFédération du Personnel Professionnel des Collèges
FPPCFederal Provincial Parks Council (Canada)
FPPCFarm Pilot Project Coordination, Inc.
FPPCFormation Prégraduée, Postgraduée et Continue
FPPCFirst Private Power Corporation
FPPCFronto-Polar Prefrontal Cortex
FPPCFitness to Practise Policy Committee (UK)
FPPCFamily and Peer Process Code
FPPCFusion Physics Planning Committee
FPPCFirst Presbyterian Church of Chattanooga (Tennessee)
FPPCFinancial Policy and Planning Committee
FPPCFirst Pakistan Palaeontologic Convention
FPPCFinal Plan for Permanent Closure
FPPCFrantschach Pulp and Paper Czech
FPPCFunboard & Plongée Pornic Club
References in periodicals archive ?
Zhou Enlai replied that the five principles of peaceful coexistence applied to Sino-Burmese relations, and China would not export revolution to Burma.
Oli said Nepal and China enjoy long-term close relations, and both countries uphold the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence and respect each other's core interests and major concerns.
The Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, namely mutual respect for sovereignty and territorial integrity, mutual non-aggression, non-interference in each other's internal affairs, equality and mutual benefit, and peaceful coexistence, were endorsed by China and India in the 1950s, and have been widely accepted as norms for relations between countries.
On 1 January 1970, China restored peaceful coexistence as the primary theme of its foreign policy by officially declaring its willingness to establish or improve diplomatic relations with all countries, regardless of their social systems, on the basis of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence. China received a large number of foreign delegations, expressed renewed interest in joining the United Nations, signed aid agreements, and established diplomatic relations.
As advocates of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, both China and India shoulder great responsibilities in maintaining peace and stability in the region and beyond.
Schottli's second case study involves an examination of Nehru's second institution: India's Panchasheela Agreement (also known as the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence) with China and the debate over the status of Tibet.
China, Cambodia, and the five principles of peaceful coexistence
The Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence have been used as the guide for China's foreign policy since the 1950s.
India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, envisioned a China and India unified by a common history of exploitation by the West--a vision that he called "Asianism." In 1954, the two countries established a set of norms aimed at preserving amicable relations between them known as the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence. More recently, China and India have sought to engage more strategically on a range of issues, including trade, climate change and poverty alleviation.
However, China emphasised the upholding of the five principles of peaceful coexistence, in particular the principle of non-interference into others' internal affairs.
This anti-imperialist and pro-revolutionary stand was clearly seen in the "Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence"(12) advocated by Zhou En-lai at the Bandung Conference in April 1955.
We should uphold the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, resolutely abandon the Cold War mentality and power politics, respect the social systems and development paths chosen independently by every nation, respect each other's core interests and major concerns, and take the new road of dialogue without confrontation, partnership instead of alliances.