FOTU

(redirected from Forms of Things Unknown)
AcronymDefinition
FOTUForms of Things Unknown (band)
FOTUFriends of the Unborn (Chicago, IL)
References in periodicals archive ?
And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name.
The poet's eye, in fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name.
This reviewer was reminded of Shakespeare's beautiful lines: "The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name" Not taking the lines too literally, one can grasp the spirit of the point that is being made.
Shakespeare, too, was alert to the epistemically dissonant character of poetry: The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name (Wordsworth edition.
The last essay in this volume is Richard Wright's "The Literature of the Negro in the United States." In this essay on black writing, Wright comments on a number of Harlem Renaissance writers; he explains "The Forms of Things Unknown"; and he discusses the "Negro" as a social construct.
The Forms of Things Unknown: Renaissance Metaphor in 'Romeo and Juliet' and 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'.
In Peurs et mensonges Khelladi has simply told his personal story of disenchantment with Algerian politics and life in a plain style which fails to capture the imagination, that which embodies the "forms of things unknown" and is the quintessence of belles lettres.
Wright, himself, in "The Literature of the Negro in the United States," distinguishes between "The Narcissistic Level" - borrowed forms of culture that middle-class African Americans try to make their own - and "The Forms of Things Unknown" - the native expressions developed from the experiences of migratory, working-class blacks.