FRTR

(redirected from From Ritual to Romance)
Also found in: Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
FRTRFrom Revolution to Reconstruction (American history)
FRTRFederal Remediation Technologies Roundtable
FRTRFrom Ritual to Romance (band)
FRTRFront Range Toll Road (Colorado)
FRTRFox River Trail Runners (Illinois)
References in periodicals archive ?
From Ritual to Romance. Garden City: Doubleday, 1957.
She also gives a clear account of the use Eliot made of Jessie Weston's From Ritual to Romance and James Frazer's The Golden Bough.
Weston, Jesse 1983 (1919): From Ritual to Romance. Gloucester MA: Peter Smith.
Goering offers what might be a pleasant little antidote to Jesse Weston's famous From Ritual to Romance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) that appeared in 1920, profoundly affecting poet T.
Frazer, and it was to reach its culmination in Jessie Weston's From Ritual to Romance (1920), where cup and spear become symbols of the female and male principles.
In From Ritual to Romance, first published in 1920 and an important source for T.S.
The basic premise of Jessie Weston's From Ritual to Romance is that the grail stories, composed mostly between 1180 and 1230 CE, contain elements of earlier myths and religious cult practices, although these have been reduced to vague,
Weston's From Ritual to Romance learn that the first task of the grail quester is the formulation of the right question and the knowledge that it needs to be asked, a necessity which, because it acknowledges the correct forms, will be answered by an amelioration.(4) Weston traces the ways in which the relevant questions and responses change over time in various versions of the grail legend, and it is precisely the fact that Weston's comparative work weaves a narrative sanctioned by history which is part of the attraction for Eliot.
Weston's From Ritual to Romance (1920) as a clue to understanding the poem's title and to Sir James Frazer's The Golden Bough (1890-1915) for its detailed study of vegetation myths and rituals.
Weston's discussion of this theory in From Ritual to Romance (1920) was the source used by T.
Loomis), the quest for an ur-Grail (Jesse Weston's From Ritual to Romance), and the introduction of Jung into the Grail mix.
Weston's From Ritual to Romance (1920), a study of some of the themes of medieval romances and legends, such as the Grail story, which probably originated in ancient fertility religions.