GDPR


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AcronymDefinition
GDPRGeneral Data Protection Regulation (EU)
GDPRGlobal Defense Posture Realignment (US DoD Transformation Plan)
GDPRGross Domestic Product per Region
GDPRGrateful Dread Public Radio (Baltimore, MD internet public radio station)
GDPRGroup of Deputy Permanent Representatives (on the public disclosure of NATO documents)
GDPRGraduate Degree Progress Report (Southern Methodist University; Texas)
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References in periodicals archive ?
(47.) See Crosman, supra note 10 ("I don't know that if I had one European customer I would go through the effort of complying with GDPR ...
At the same time, an initial text was published for what would later become the GDPR. 'I wondered to what extent the GDPR - as it was proposed then - would outline the risks arising from big data and what would be done about them.'
Corporations, law firms and service providers improve discovery and achieve compliance with HIPAA, GDPR and other regulations by identifying and managing access to personal identifiers in both structured and unstructured data.
Initial concerns about how the new GDPR regulations would affect contact centres, in terms of increasing costs and complexity of managing enquires, have to some extent dissipated.
A year on from the implementation of GDPR, businesses are expected to be well-versed in the regulations.
One of GDPR's most virtuous traits is that it is specific.
Are all of our employees fully trained in GDPR? Do you have a clear record of consent for each data subject?
Engage in Learning's Managing Director, Chris Horseman, said, "Our original GDPR e-learning course, which is available in various languages, has proved especially popular with organisations in the financial services, IT and retail industries.
Several third-party investigations suggest that at least 100 organizations have paid fines to the GDPR authorities for failing to fully comply with the regulation.
Putting investigations aside, GDPR has also driven benefits for EU consumers as companies have stepped up their efforts to educate the public on their data practices.
The figure of [euro]56m may seem low considering the buildup prior to May last year and the fact that GDPR's scope effectively covers any company in the world handling the data of European citizens.
TWELVE months on from the implementation of the new data protection rules, known as GDPR, European data protection agencies have issued fines totalling [euro]56m from more than 200,000 reported cases.