GULAG


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AcronymDefinition
GULAGGlavnoe Upravlenie Ispravitel-no-trudovykh Lagerei (Chief Directorate of prison camps in former Soviet Union)
References in periodicals archive ?
So does the inclusion of the Gulag. Anderson writes that "Like the penal labour camps of twentieth-century Europe, convict transportation, exile and collective resettlement in Russia and the Soviet Union are not usually incorporated into such estimates" (7).
It's like Stalin visiting one of his gulags and handing out aspirins to the skeletal, dying wretches while giving a thumbs-up to the cameras.
In 1962, Khrushchev allowed writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who spent eight years in the camps, to publish his novel, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, about a typical day in the gulag. Solzhenitsyns novel won the Nobel Prize and brought worldwide attention to the Soviet labour camps.
While the musical life of Nazi concentration camps (especially, Theresienstadt) has been studied thoroughly, most of the existing accounts on the Gulag have paid little attention to music and musicians.
Oblivion is compelling as a novel, but factor in the historical importance of this epoch in Russia's past and it becomes a necessary novel of Gulag literature.
Abuse of human rights stood at the center of the Gulag experience.
? Just Send Me Word: A True Story Of Love And Survival In The Gulag by Orlando Figes (Allen Lane, pounds 20) The history professor tells the amazing love story of two students from Moscow.
TURNING A BLIND EYE TO NORTH KOREA'S 'HIDDEN GULAG' (The Washington Post, Washington)
Tamara Petkevich first imagined that she would record her experiences as a GULAG prisoner when she was 23 years old.
As an American I might say that my translating a memoir of a 'boss' in Stalin's Gulag was pure chance, but if I were Russian, I would no doubt say that it was fate.