GWTW

AcronymDefinition
GWTWGone With The Wind (novel)
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References in periodicals archive ?
GWTWs depiction of slavery and the Civil-War era American South.
Washington said the final scene in "Django,'' a plantation in flames, is a direct reference to "Gone With the Wind.'' But she added "GWTW'' "has a really important place in the history of filmmaking, and in the history of African-Americans at the Oscars, in the history of messaging and how we portray history.
Washington said the final scene in "Django," a plantation in flames, is a direct reference to "Gone With the Wind." But she added "GWTW" "has a really important place in the history of filmmaking, and in the history of African-Americans at the Oscars, in the history of messaging and how we portray history.
Never underestimate the South's love of tradition and, especially, its tenacious stewardship of all things GWTW. From an original Scarlett gown to Mitchell's Remington typewriter, there's plenty to experience.
Even scholars who have revisited the historic roles of southern women in the Civil War era and GWTW's cinematic portrayal of them are still unwilling to give Scarlett her due.
I love GWTW but I never watch it without hoping that Scarlet O'Hara will realise earlier that she loves him and that Ashley is nothing more than a spineless wimp.
In May of last year, a federal district court in Georgia enjoined the distribution of The Wind Done Gone, "TWDG," a novel that critiqued and parodied Margaret Mitchell's Gone With The Wind, "GWTW." The initial decision received wide news coverage; the subsequent decision of the United States Court of Appeals reversing the lower court was less well publicized.
Those seeking literary parodies of GWTW might want to check out 1990's The Book of Sequels, with side-splitting vignettes written in the styles of Erica Jong, Tama Janowitz, and Alice Walker.
That it is published in multiple translations, that the movie has been viewed by audiences around the globe, is a matter of horror and frustration for the African American community Even as ground is gained in battles against racism here in the US, GWTW reinscribes the fixed stereotypes of the elephantine, asexual and devoted Mammy, the shiftless a silly Prissy, and the good, because servile and dependable, Pork.
This placing side by side, whether sequentially as in 'Space Fiction' or in parallel-column fashion as in 'Climbing Rangitoto/Descending the Guggenheim' and the more recent quite tantalising 'The Snips of Castor Bay' and 'GWTW' (Landfall 177), does not so much intimate an equivalence as it does a kind of an attentive ambivalence.
Nor does Minter fail to note that GWTW is also "an emphatically white novel" implicated in a vicious kind of racism (210).