GARA

(redirected from General Aviation Revitalization Act)
AcronymDefinition
GARAGeneral Aviation Revitalization Act
GARAGive A Rat's Ass
GARAGlasgow Anti-Racist Alliance (Scotland, UK)
GARAGlobus Architecture for Reservation and Allocation
GARAGroupe Alésien de Recherches Archéologiques (French: Alès Archaeological Research Group; Ales, France)
GARAGreensboro Amateur Radio Association (Greensboro, NC)
GARAGreenhouse Action in Regional Australia (New South Wales, Australia)
GARAGroupe Alpine Rhône-Alpes (French automobile club; Rhone-Alpes, France)
References in periodicals archive ?
Federal Reform: General Aviation Revitalization Act
Panel Discussion, General Aviation Revitalization Act, 63 J.
Anton, A Critical Evaluation of the General Aviation Revitalization Act of 1994, 63 J.
Yodice, The General Aviation Revitalization Act, AOPA PILOT, Feb.
The General Aviation Revitalization Act was enacted to limit civil actions against aircraft manufacturers and, as the name suggests, to revitalize the general aviation industry.
After years of effort, the Congress passed and the president signed the General Aviation Revitalization Act, whose goal was to lift the unfair burden of product liability suits from the manufacturers after their products had proved themselves safe.
McAllister, A "Tail " of Liability Reform: General Aviation Revitalization Act of 1994 and the General Aviation Industry in the United States, 23 Transp.
Ladd Sanger (Note), Will the General Aviation Revitalization Act of 1994 Allow the Industry to Fly High Once Again?
38) In 1994, after a long and bitter legislative battle involving the successful use of an arcane legislative role known as the discharge petition, reformers finally achieved victory when the General Aviation Revitalization Act was released from committee and voted into law over the objections of Jack Brooks, long-time chairman of the House Judiciary Committee.
The legislative battle over the General Aviation Revitalization Act had all the trappings of good political drama: populist politicians fighting the special interests, led by an organization representing lawyers, to preserve an American institution, its light aircraft industry.
In this study, we ask whether product liability killed American general aviation and if so, whether the General Aviation Revitalization Act will rescue the industry.
Over the next several years, the group saw its proposal whittled down to the General Aviation Revitalization Act, which passed in 1994.
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