GSM

(redirected from Guanghua School of Management)
AcronymDefinition
GSMGlobal System for Mobile Communications (cellular phone technology)
GSMGraduate School of Management
GSMGeneral Skilled Migration (Australia immigration)
GSMGrams per Square Meter (paper weight)
GSMGreater Swiss Mountain (dogs)
GSMGeneral Service Medal (UK)
GSMGalvanized Sheet Metal
GSMGoSupermodel (website)
GSMGlobal Standard for Mobile
GSMGender and Sexual Minorities
GSMGeneral Shareholders Meeting (various locations)
GSMGlobal Sales Management (various organizations)
GSMGlobal Supply Management (various companies)
GSMGeneral Sales Manager
GSMGuanghua School of Management (China)
GSMGroup Special Mobile
GSMGrams per Square Meter
GSMGenerative Shape Modeling
GSMGlobal System for Mobile Communication
GSMGlobal Subscriber Manager
GSMGroupe Spéciale Mobile (cellular system)
GSMGood Samaritan Ministries (various locations)
GSMGaussian Scale Mixture
GSMGold Standard Multimedia
GSMGarrison Sergeant Major (British army; UK)
GSMGrenache, Shiraz, Mourvedre (wine)
GSMGoal Scoring Machine
GSMGame, Set, Match (movie)
GSMGreenstar Social Marketing (Pakistan)
GSMGlobal Systems Mobile (telecommunication)
GSMGhajnsielem (postal locality, Malta)
GSMGlobal Studies Minor (various schools)
GSMGeneral Strategic Management (various schools)
GSMGlobal Shared Memory
GSMGround Station Module
GSMGuitar Scales Method (software)
GSMGeneral Support Maintenance
GSMGranite State Management (Concord, NH)
GSMGrace Student Ministries (various locations)
GSMGeological Society of Malaysia
GSMGeneralized Scattering Matrix
GSMGas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) (USN Rating)
GSMGroup Scout Master (Baden-Powell Scouts' Association)
GSMGretai Securities Market (Taiwan)
GSMGinebra San Miguel, Inc
GSMGeneral System for Mobile Communications
GSMGaling Sa Magnanakaw (stolen cell phones)
GSMGeocentric Solar Magnetospheric Coordinate System (also seen as GSMCS)
GSMGlobal Service Manager (Sprint)
GSMGame Skill Measure
GSMGreat Scots Magazine (bi-monthly magazine for Scottish terrier lovers)
GSMGlobal Society Makers (India)
GSMGeneralized Sequential Machine
GSMGigabit Ethernet Switching Module (Xylan)
GSMGay Skinhead Movement
GSMGeneradora San Mateo (Guatemalan power generating corporation)
GSMGlobal Social Movement
GSMGraphic Size Modification (ITU-T)
GSMGood Shepherds Movement (UK)
GSMGimme Some Money (Spinal Tap song)
GSMGreen Sheet Media (UK)
GSMGroup Switch Module
GSMGeneral Services Management
GSMGlobal System Manager
GSMGlobecomm Services Maryland (Laurel, MD)
GSMGeneralized Space-Mapping (device modeling approach)
GSMGeneral Forward Set-Up Information Message (ITU-T)
GSMGround Safety Manager
GSMGuntzelman-Sullivan-Marshall Productions
GSMGeneral Surface Mount(ing)
GSMGlobal State Manager
GSMGovernment Supplied Material (Canada)
GSMGerman Seamen’s Mission
GSMGeneral Stores Material
GSMGround Support Module
GSMGlobal Support Message
GSMGeniospasm
GSMGraphic Screen Manager (Megasys)
GSMGram per Squared Metre
GSMGreat Scott Marty (Back to the Future movie)
GSMGround Support Maintenance
GSMGeneric Services Model (ANSI)
GSMGround Safety Monitor
GSMGeneral Sales Meeting
GSMGeorgia Square Mall (Athens, GA)
GSMGlobal, Strategic, Major (market segments)
GSMGeneral System Manual
GSMGeneric Simulation Manager
GSMGeneric Satellite Model
GSMGround Signal Mixer
GSMGood, Sound and Merchantable
GSMGross Square Metre (Canada)
GSMGreen Smoking Monster
GSMGPRS (General Packet Radio Service) Session Management (telecommunications)
GSMGlobal Service for Mobiles
References in periodicals archive ?
"(http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/acd3f2fc-084a-11e6-876d-b823056b209b.html#axzz46kYIUgyx) It is wrong to assume that 'too much debt' is bad only if it causes a crisis, and this is a typical assumption made by almost every economist," Michael Pettis, professor at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management, wrote in a draft of a forthcoming paper shared with the Financial Times. "The most obvious example is Japan after 1990.
Michael Pettis, Professor of Finance at the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, will discuss how China will cope with the challenge of adjusting to the deep imbalances created during three decades of rapid growth.
This view is supported by Michael Pettis, professor of finance at Guanghua School of Management at Peking University in Beijing, who argues that in order for the Chinese economy to successfully re-balance away from relying on exports towards a consumer demand-driven economy over the coming years "GDP growth must drop every year for the next five or six years by at least 1 percentage point".
''The VIE structure is the only way at present to play this game,'' said Paul Gillis, a professor at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management. ''So if you want to invest in restricted sectors of China's economy, you have to get comfortable with the VIE structure.''
"The VIE structure is the only way at present to play this game," said Paul Gillis, a professor at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management. "So if you want to invest in restricted sectors of China's economy, you have to get comfortable with the VIE structure."
A 2013 piece on China's FR by Michael Pettis, a finance professor at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management, sheds interesting light on what is happening in the world's second largest economy.
Moderator: Paul Gillis, PhD, CPA, Co-director IMBA program at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management and Publisher of China Accounting Blog
However, Michael Pettis, a professor at Peking University s Guanghua School of Management, said the Chinese economic system did not generally encourage such innovation.
Zheng, an economist at Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, pointed out China's leaders are worrying that the country's one-child policy has affected number of young workers ready to step into the country's factories.
Zhang studied the State-owned Enterprises course at the Beijing Motorola University and the Executive Master of Business Administration course at the Guanghua School of Management of the Beijing University.
Ran Zhang, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of accounting at the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University in Beijing, China.
A professor in economics and an associate dean at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management at present, Dr Cai has been serving as a director of the Mirrlees Institute of Economic Policy Research and an associate director of the Institute of Poverty Research at Peking University since 2006.
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