HEELS


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AcronymDefinition
HEELSHoning Executive English Language Skills (University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler)
HEELSHelicopter Emergency Egress Lighting System
References in classic literature ?
Dorothy now took Toto up solemnly in her arms, and having said one last good-bye she clapped the heels of her shoes together three times, saying:
Then he turned on his heel and strode from the armory.
And in passing we note that that historic phrase, the Iron Heel, originated in Ernest Everhard's mind.
But it were ridiculous to assert that the Iron Heel was a necessary stepping- stone.
Nor even then, as the Everhard Manuscript well shows, was any permanence attributed to the Iron Heel.
It is quite clear that she intended the Manuscript for immediate publication, as soon as the Iron Heel was overthrown, so that her husband, so recently dead, should receive full credit for all that he had ventured and accomplished.
Undoubtedly she was executed by the Mercenaries; and, as is well known, no record of such executions was kept by the Iron Heel.
Even though only around 30 percent of women still wear heels to work, according to data Crum cites, there's still a dominant notion that powerful women wear power heels.
You see it on the red carpet, famous faces alighting from limousines and strolling casually into the theatre, confidently and serenely, raised up on five inch, stick thin heels, feet bent double and not flinching for a second.
Women workers should not be compelled to wear high heels against their will.
Wearing high heels regularly (at least three days a week) changes the normal movement of the ankle joint.
The figure is a significant shift from last year when 35% bought trainers and 35% bought heels.