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HITCHHPV (Human Papillomavirus) Infection and Transmission among Couples through Heterosexual Activity (study; Canada)
References in classic literature ?
At the appointed hour Elder William Hitch rose, and, in an irritated voice, as if he had already been contradicted, said, "I tell you that Joe Smith is a martyr, that his brother Hiram is a martyr, and that the persecutions of the United States Government against the prophets will also make a martyr of Brigham Young.
Irwine had said about a probable hitch in the love-making between Adam and Mary Burge, "we'll say no more about it at present.
We've got to hitch to windward of that Mark Boat somehow," George cried.
One's fisher-fashion - any end first an' a slippery hitch over all - an' the other's -"
With a hitch of his broad Bokhariot belt the Pathan swaggered off into the gloaming, and the lama came down from his clouds so far as to look at the broad back.
In obedience to Mother Rigby's word, and extending its arm as if to reach her outstretched hand, the figure made a step forward--a kind of hitch and jerk, however, rather than a step--then tottered and almost lost its balance.
Yes, it must have been the third, for I remember that it was boldly planned and that it was carried out without a hitch.
Without regard to the fact that harness is heavy, and a horse's back high, Martin would order him to hitch up.
His idea of bringing the Emersons to Windy Corner struck her as decidedly good, and she carried through the negotiations without a hitch.
He had, in truth, drunk very little--not a fourth of the quantity which a systematic tippler could carry to church on a Sunday afternoon without a hitch in his eastings of genuflections; but the weakness of Sir John's constitution made mountains of his petty sins in this kind.
When the end came it was she who had to tell him to hitch up and go for the undertaker, and she thought it "funny" that he had not settled beforehand who was to have his mother's clothes and the sewing-machine.
He won't move on," says the constable calmly, with a slight professional hitch of his neck involving its better settlement in his stiff stock, "although he has been repeatedly cautioned, and therefore I am obliged to take him into custody.