HLRO

AcronymDefinition
HLROHouse of Lords Record Office (UK)
References in classic literature ?
I invite you, friends, to join in praise for this signal deliverance from the hands of barbarians and infidels, to the comfortable and solemn tones of the tune called ' Northampton'.
thou hast seen enough to split the planets and make an infidel of Abraham, and not one syllable is thine
For every walk is a sort of crusade, preached by some Peter the Hermit in us, to go forth and reconquer this Holy Land from the hands of the Infidels.
They would be shocked at the propo- sition of fellowshipping a SHEEP-stealer; and at the same time they hug to their communion a MAN- stealer, and brand me with being an infidel, if I find fault with them for it.
I am quite an Infidel about it, and shall never be converted.
And now his heart Distends with pride, and hardning in his strength Glories: For never since created man, Met such imbodied force, as nam'd with these Could merit more then that small infantry Warr'd on by Cranes: though all the Giant brood Of PHLEGRA with th' Heroic Race were joyn'd That fought at THEB'S and ILIUM, on each side Mixt with auxiliar Gods; and what resounds In Fable or ROMANCE of UTHERS Son Begirt with BRITISH and ARMORIC Knights; And all who since, Baptiz'd or Infidel Jousted in ASPRAMONT or MONTALBAN, DAMASCO, or MAROCCO, or TREBISOND, Or whom BISERTA sent from AFRIC shore When CHARLEMAIN with all his Peerage fell By FONTARABBIA.
Nay, by St Mary, brother Brian, you must not think you are now in Palestine, predominating over heathen Turks and infidel Saracens; we islanders love not blows, save those of holy Church, who chasteneth whom she loveth.
We might start at five o'clock and be in time, but the delay may cause your friend to pass an uneasy night, and therefore we had better go with all speed to extricate him from the hands of the infidels.
The Emperor of Constantinople,[*] to oppose his neighbours, sent ten thousand Turks into Greece, who, on the war being finished, were not willing to quit; this was the beginning of the servitude of Greece to the infidels.
Some patriarchs wore awful turbans, but the grand mass of the infidel horde wore the fiery red skull-cap they call a fez.
If he had died during that time when he was little better than an infidel he would have been lost; he believed implicitly in pain everlasting, he believed in it much more than in eternal happiness; and he shuddered at the dangers he had run.
Shouting on the foe he fell, And like thunder rang his war-cry O'er the cowering infidel.