HNPC

(redirected from Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal)
AcronymDefinition
HNPCHereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal (carcinoma)
HNPCHuman Neural Precursor Cell
HNPCHuman Neuronal Progenitor Cells
References in periodicals archive ?
The International Collaborative Group on Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (ICGHNPCC).
While, some authorities are of the belief that Fordyce's spots are also seen in some rheumatic disorders and in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome.
Of the familial CRC syndromes, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), or Lynch syndrome, are the most common.
2] The two most common forms of autosomal dominant inherited colorectal cancer disorders are hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), or Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).
Familial risk of tumors associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: a Swedish population-based study.
Prognostic relevance of MLH1 and MSH2 mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients.
Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also named as Lynch syndrome, on the other hand, is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that is believed to account for 2-10 per cent of all cases of colorectal cancer (1).
Professor Burn and team therefore decided to undertake a randomised trial in a high-risk population, namely, patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC).
Investigators from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, urged that all endometrial cancer patients younger than 50 years be screened for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) mutations.
The latter may be related to the increase risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma seen in the patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC).
3) There are several different forms of hereditary (familial) colorectal cancers, the most common of which are familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (also known as Lynch syndrome).
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