HOGD

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AcronymDefinition
HOGDHermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (gaming)
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After laying out the fundamental principles of magick and the rudiments of meditation and visualization, the author presents the three core rituals of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn: the Middle Pillar, which is designed to help its practitioners manipulate energy; the Qabalistic Cross, whose reputed benefits include enhanced focus and stress reduction; and the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram, which, among other things, is said to cleanse one's aura and surroundings and to yield energetic protection and mental clarity.
He was said to be an enthusiastic member of The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, an organisation devoted to studying the occult, metaphysics and paranormal activity set up by three Freemasons.
Chapters 7-9 jump to more modern forms of magic, including the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and the Ordo Temporalis Ordii, and modern forms of sex-magic.
Waite was privy to the rituals and secret practices of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, founded on March 1, 1888, by William Robert Woodman (1828-1891), William Westcott (1848-1925), and S.L.
This quotation comes from one of the central oaths taken by members of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. The Golden Dawn, which we might define as inhabiting a gray area between quasi-Masonic order, cabbalistic cult, and bachelor's fraternity, experienced a surge of popularity following its inception in 1888 through the end of the 1920s.
The author's use of tarot for magic is based on the tarot correspondences developed by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (HOGD) founded in 1888 by freemasons and dedicated to studying and practicing magic for the betterment of humanity.
In 1890 he was admitted to the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, a secret society founded in London which had among its members many influential Edwardian society figures.
It can be demonstrated that Yeats's poetic ideals were directly tied to his interest in magic and the occult sciences, specifically the qabalah of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Indeed, both poetry and magic entail the deliberate manipulation of symbols with forethought and intent.