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Their social status relates to the groups with which they are best associated at particular points in time--landowners and lawyers in the SAE case and merchants and manufacturers in the IAAG case, both during the mid 19th century.
The data in Table 1 reflect the stated situation for the SAE, IAAG, and SAA combined.
If the migrants are representative of the total memberships of which they were a part then, in the period 1880 to 1914, the SAE, IAAG, and SAA were unable to reproduce the economic class origins of their" founders.
This detail relates to each of the SAE, IAAG, and SAA and includes SAE membership numbers from 1880 to 1914.
Complete and comparable data were unavailable for members bets of the IAAG and the SAA.
For the SAE, the equivalent data were 53% and 73%, the IAAG 64% and 49%, aim the SAA 50% and 75%.
These proportions are almost identical for those of the SAE and IAAG immigrants (see Appendix 2).
A similar type of difference appears with the IAAG data.
The change reflected fewer class and upper middle class men and more from lower middle class and working class backgrounds in the memberships of the SAE, IAAG, and SAA.