INARI


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AcronymDefinition
INARIInternational Agency for Rural Industrialization
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, such a deity becomes a cornerstone of Buddhist rituals, even those relating to the enthronement of an emperor, and the connection to foxes led to its integration with the well-known kami, Inari.
Inari 2 Lodge sleeps four and can be booked from PS489 for three nights.
Hammastunturi lies in the municipality of Inari and is located in what is known as the "Sami reindeer herding area," in which reindeer husbandry has priority (Fig.
The project leader Prof Inari Kursula said that the structures showed them that the two variants differ more from each other than actins in any other known living organism do and the high resolution enabled the researchers to identify areas within the proteins that cause the different behaviour.
uk, from PS4 stylean WALLPAPER Sanderson inari wallpaper teal, John Lewis, PS50 SIDEBOARD The Freud chest, Graham and www.
Fran Kurth visited the Fushimi Inari shrine in Kyoto.
In addition, the languages South and Lule Sami are spoken in Norway; South, Lule, Ume and Pite Sami in Sweden; Skolt and Inari Sami in Finland; and Skolt, Kildin and Ter Sami in Russia (Seurujarvi-Kari, 2012).
All Sami have a strong connection with nature and the land that their ancestors have been using,'' said Aile Aikio, curator at the Sami Museum in Inari, Finland.
In the Sami language, the magazine Anaras of Inari (Finland) lacked a website, as did the literature magazine Avali in Corsica and the socially owned children's magazine Rouzig in the Breton community.
This spirit of cooperation now extends to Norway as well: the Pasvik Inari Trilateral Park, completed In 2003, spans the Barents region of Finland, Russia and Norway.
Low horizons and a lack of light pollution certainly provide favourable conditions for the lights, while the nearby pine forest-fringed Lake Inari is an attractive setting for photographers.
The kitsune are ambiguous spirits in Japanese folklore; they are seen as messengers for Inari, the rice diety, but they also function as the shape-shifting tricksters so common in mythology.