INARI


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AcronymDefinition
INARIInternational Agency for Rural Industrialization
References in periodicals archive ?
The principals of Inceptus were founders of several successful medical device startup companies including Microvention (now part of Terumo), Sequent Medical, SenoRx (now part of CR Bard) and Inari.
Inari Holdings is the key holding vehicle for all the Inari Group of companies that serve a wide-ranging cross-section of businesses globally.
An Inari 2 lodge at Black Hall with its sauna and spacious living area and, right, Benjamin and Amelia at the West Midlands Safari Park
Options at the Wilderness Hotel include forest walks and boat rides to one of the 3,000 islands in Lake Inari, or snowmobiling and ice fishing in winter.
52) For a different perspective of the revolt, see EFRAIM KARSH & INARI KARSH, EMPIRES OF THE SAND: THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN THE MIDDLE EAST, 1789-1923, at 191-94 (1999).
8400 BP, though two somewhat anomalous dates from Inari go back as far as c.
Chromosome numbers of phanerogams in Inari Lapland and adjacent regions.
Offerings include a case study of Saami and Finnish and papers on grade alternation in a Saami language and its abstract declarative phonology, productive syncretism in inflectional morphology, roots and verbs in North Saami, evidence for the instability of systems with ternary length distinctions, and events and case in Inari Saami along with Inari Saami verbal agreement.
I've let my friend, Inari, the prince of the foxes, lick my wounds clean and feed me his spirit flesh when I was on the verge of death.
Products that contain GM derivatives sold in the UK include Schwartz Bacon Flavour Bits Soya Pieces, which includes ingredients manufactured from GM soya and corn and which is sold in Sainsbury's, and a vegetarian sushi sold in Waitrose, which includes Inari made from GM soya.
The effect of temperature fluctuations on oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion of underyearling Lake Inari Arctic charr.
For an argument that they have, at least for the Middle East, see the brilliant study by Efraim Karsh and Inari Karsh, Empires of the Sand: The Struggle for Mastery in the Middle East, 1789-1923, Harvard University Press.