IWDS

AcronymDefinition
IWDSIllinois Workforce Development System (Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity)
IWDSInternational White Dove Society
IWDSImproved Weather Dissemination System
IWDSImproved Weapons Delivery System
IWDSInternal Water Distribution System
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References in periodicals archive ?
Once meaningful data are gathered one could proceed to initiate an intensive educational effort, starting very early in life, to alter the community's and society's negative view of IwDs. As part of this process, all need to appreciate that individuals with disabilities are more than a check list of "deficits." They need to be seen as human beings who have the capability to contribute to the community, although they will require more supports to accomplish that goal.
Social supports: As has been well-documented IwDs and their families are often marginalized and isolated.
It is influenced by the medical, social and psychological circumstances of the IwDs and has an important impact on her/his well-being.
Emergency supports: IwDs are more vulnerable to emergencies and mishaps.
IWD based feature selection algorithm [7] is implemented to select best features to provide an accurate and fast classification.
Pseudo code of IWD based feature selection algorithm.
where [a.sub.v], [b.sub.v], [c.sub.v] are the static parameters used to represent the nonlinear relationship between the velocity of water drop IWD, i.e.
The IWD's soil, [soil.sup.IWD], is increased by removing some soil of the selected features F.
March 8, 2011 marked the 100th anniversary of IWD. Global advocacy groups positioned this milestone birthday as a gender equality initiative launch-pad.
Using the 2011 IWD centenary as a research lens, analyzed within feminist theoretical frameworks (Eisenstein, 2010; Eisenstein 2007, 1996, 1984, 1981; Mohanty, Pratt, & Riley 2008; Mohanty, 2003), and via historians (Chatterjee, 2002; Clements, 1985; Goldman, 2001; Lapidus 1975; Stites, 1978), this paper provides a historic synopsis of IWD and of women in Russia, then considers the neoliberal and materialist backlash of IWD in the U.S.
IWD, launched in 1911 in Denmark by German socialist Clara Zetkin, and first celebrated in Sweden and Germany, fused tenets of socialism with feminism, championing suffrage as essential to advancing women's civic voice (Chatterjee, 2002).
Known for its socialist roots, IWD gained international ground through the 1945 United Nation (UN) charter, proclaiming gender equality as a fundamental human right, and the 1975 International Women's Year, where the UN sanctioned March 8 as IWD (UN Women, 2011).