IGB

(redirected from Illegal Gambling Business)
AcronymDefinition
IGBIllinois Gaming Board
IGBInternationaler Gewerkschaftsbund (German: International Trade Union Federation)
IGBIstituto di Genetica e Biofisica (Italy)
IGBInner-German Border (former boundary/border between East and West Germany)
IGBIllegal Gambling Business
IGBInlet Gearbox (gas turbines)
IGBInstitute & Guild of Brewing (now known as the Institute of Brewing & Distilling; UK)
IGBIntermediate Gear Box
IGBInternational Gravimetric Bureau (France)
IGB(Fraunhofer) Institut für Grenzflächen- und Bioverfahrenstechnik, Stuttgart, Germany
References in periodicals archive ?
(126) Under this standard, five or more persons who "conduct, finance, manage, supervise, direct or own all or part of such business" are members of an illegal gambling business. (127) However, to target these illegal gambling businesses, the members of the gambling venture must perform "a 'necessary function' in the operation of the enterprise," (128) and cannot merely be gamblers utilizing the services of the business to place bets or wagers.
Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit overturned Weinstein's decision, concluding that criminal liability under the Illegal Gambling Business Act hinges on state definitions of illegal gambling.
They face up to five years in jail if convicted of running an illegal gambling business and 20 years if done for money laundering.
While Congress did not intend for individuals placing bets be counted as part of the five or more persons requirement, Congress did want to the courts to liberally count anyone engaged in the operation of the illegal gambling business "regardless of how minor their roles." (21) The Act also does not require absolute or total continuity in the gambling operations.
[section] 1955, would 'merge' with the money-laundering statute." (31) As a result of this merger, lottery operators ordinarily facing five years of imprisonment for running an illegal gambling business would be subject instead to twenty years of imprisonment for violating the federal money laundering statute.
(20) Congress used the Wire Act, Travel Act, and Illegal Gambling Business Act to regulate, prohibit, and prosecute online gambling.
Wire Act, the Travel Act, and the Illegal Gambling Business Act, as well as several state laws, impede the cross-border supply of recreational gambling services, contrary to the U.S.
Finally, the Illegal Gambling Business Act prohibits conducting, financing, managing, supervising, directing or owning "all or part of an illegal gambling business" (18 U.S.C.
In his well-written piece, Plotz explains how a small group of Palmetto state lobbyists, politicians, and machine owners transformed a small-time illegal gambling business into a multi-billion-dollar legal one.
Jason Siebert, 44, of Hot Springs followed in his father's footsteps and recently pleaded guilty to one federal count of operating an illegal gambling business.