IRAP

(redirected from Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure)
AcronymDefinition
IRAPImposta Regionale sulle Attività Produttive (Italy)
IRAPIndustrial Research Assistance Program (National Research Council, Canada)
IRAPInnovative Research and Products (Stamford, CT)
IRAPInterleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protein
IRAPImplicit Relational Assessment Procedure (psychology)
IRAPIonizing Radiation and Polymers Symposium
IRAPInternational Roaming Access Protocol
IRAPIntelligent RF Access Point (Airespace)
IRAPInteragency Radiological Assistance Plan
IRAPInjury Risk Assessment and Prevention (University of Louisville)
IRAPInfosec Registered Assessor Program (Australia)
IRAPImage Reduction and Analysis Package (NASA)
IRAPInterim Response Action Plan (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality)
IRAPIraqi Refugee Assistance Project (Yale Law School)
IRAPInternational Research Assistance Program
References in periodicals archive ?
The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) is one task used to measure implicit attitudes.
To minimize some of the inherent limitations of the IAT and provide a means of assessing relational networks of greater interest to basic researchers in RFT, the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) has been developed by Dermot Holmes-Barnes and his colleagues (2006) as an alternative procedure for the implicit assessment of psychological variables.
Another latency-based behavioral measure that has been used in this area is the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP).
One procedure recently developed from within the behavior-analytic tradition that aims to provide a sensitive measure of such brief and immediate relational responding is the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP; Barnes-Holmes, Barnes-Holmes, Power, Hayden, Milne, & Stewart, 2006).
The currently most popular method in this regard is the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP; Barnes-Holmes, Murphy, Barnes-Holmes, & Stewart, 2010), which was based on relational frame theory (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001), an account of human language and cognition that draws heavily on the concept of derived stimulus relations.
Relational Frame Theory (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001) researchers have developed an alternative measure, the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP; Barnes-Holmes et al.
The currently most widely used method in this regard is the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP; Barnes-Holmes, Murphy, Barnes-Holmes, & Stewart, 2010), which was based explicitly on relational frame theory (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001), an account that aims to bring together the study of derived stimulus relations and human language and cognition (for a detailed treatment of the theoretical development of the IRAP see Barnes-Holmes, Barnes-Holmes, Stewart, & Boles, 2010).
The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP; Barnes-Holmes, Barnes-Holmes, Stewart, & Boles, 2010) represents one such task.
These include the widely known Implicit Association Test (IAT: Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998), the Function Acquisition Speed Test (FAST: O'Reilly, Roche, Ruiz, Tyndall, & Gavin, 2012), and the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP: Barnes-Holmes, Barnes-Holmes, Stewart, & Boles, 2010).
The method, known as the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP), is a computer based task that requires participants to respond quickly and accurately (under time pressure) to sets of stimuli employing a response pattern that may be considered consistent or inconsistent with their previous learning histories (see Barnes-Holmes, Barnes-Holmes, Stewart, & Boles, 2010).
Specifically, the implicit relational assessment procedure (IRAP) was developed to assess relational framing in natural language.
A commonly used assessment is the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP; Barnes-Holmes et al.