IFDI

(redirected from Inward Foreign Direct Investment)
AcronymDefinition
IFDIInward Foreign Direct Investment (UK)
IFDIIvy Funds Distributor, Inc. (Shawnee Mission, KS)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Vietnam's government, inward foreign direct investment increased by nearly 70% year-on-year in the first five months of 2019, the largest such increase since 2015.
Hypothesis No 2: Inward foreign direct investment results in enhanced technological output of a country.
According to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, inward foreign direct investment is expected to increase by about 20 percent this year, to $50 billion, from $42 billion in 2017.
The government should guarantee that inward Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) should play an important role in enabling technology transfer to the country, access to innovative and larger foreign markets, capital growth, modernization and human resource progress, instead of concentrating on FDI in certain profitable sectors only.
* Takeo Hoshi, and Kozo Kiyota, Keio University, "Potentials for Inward Foreign Direct Investment in Japan"
Australias inward foreign direct investment amounted to 3.2 per cent of GDP last year, almost twice that for New Zealand, which sits at around the OECD average at 1.7 per cent.
Re-admission to the Commonwealth will merely underline Zimbabwe's re-engagement with the international community, and will pave the way for increased but limited inward foreign direct investment (FDI), tourists and trade and money flows.
Liberalization of inward foreign direct investment;
While in late 1960s and early 1970s, inward foreign direct investment (FDI) was frequently alleged to be disadvantageous for host countries, opinion in recent years have changed drastically (Sahu & Solarin, 2013).
KPMG Global China Practice, global chair, Vaugh Barber wrote in the foreword to the report, "China Outlook 2016," a nuanced analysis of economic data confirms our view that China is transitioning from an investment-intensive, export-led model of growth, to one driven by consumption and innovation, a shift that is being reflected in patterns of inward foreign direct investment and outward direct investment.
This has facilitated inward foreign direct investment (FDI) and has bolstered business and trade ties.
Iraq's current production and growth plans are also dependent on multi-billion-dollar inward foreign direct investment flows that could be at risk if Western companies decide that Baghdad will not be able to enforce its sovereign control the entire country, let alone protect the lives and property rights of foreign.