JSEA

AcronymDefinition
JSEAJesuit Secondary Education Association
JSEAJournal of Software Engineering and Applications (Scientific Research Publishing)
JSEAJapan Ship Exporters' Association
JSEAJapan Space Elevator Association (Japan)
JSEAHong Kong Joint School Economics Association
JSEAJurukur Saharuddin El-Asas (Malaysian surveyors)
JSEAJob Safety Environmental Analysis
JSEAJob Safety and Environmental Impact Analysis
JSEAJ.S. Eliezer Associates (Stanford, CT)
JSEAJunior Space Exploration Academy (Oakland, CA)
References in periodicals archive ?
Martinez Santa-Olalla, de diversos efectos de la extinta JSEA depositados en el MAN, entre los que se distinguen claramente algunos de los materiales citados en el acta del dia anterior y que acompanaban a los de Moran (19).
The JSEA was undertaken at the request of Yemen s Government of National Reconciliation and performed jointly by the World Bank Group, the United Nations, the European Union, and the Islamic Development Bank.
The JSEA (1991) study asked, "What would you identify as detracting from a successful and satisfying working relationship?" (p.
His account, however, meets to a high level the historians' demand for objectivity, and he has since managed to enhance the contribution history can make to public debate by further publications, in particular "'Manufacturing Consensus': The Role of the State Council in Brunei Darussalam," JSEAS (2000a) and The Brunei Constitution of 1959: An Inside History (2000b).
In this special issue of the Journal of Southeast Asian Studies (JSEAS), we bring together articles that outline a critical history--an elucidative archaeology--of a century and more of such research into human difference in Island Southeast Asia, revealing the entanglement of scientific investigations with colonialism, nationalism, regionalism, and their contraries.
The way in which violence is remembered in Southeast Asia connects four of our six research articles in this latest issue of JSEAS. Situated in the killing fields of Cambodia, the eastern coastline of the Thai Far South, the uneven sociopolitical terrain of (the former) East Timor, and in the Sierra Madre of the Philippines, the articles trace how diverse communities across the region interact with the dead, erect memorials, create symbols, and perform legends in order to cope with past and current struggles over belonging, memory, place, and power.
Bowie, Kesaya Noda, Frank Reynolds, the participants of the Theravada Buddhist Civilizations Workshop and the anonymous reviewers of JSEAS.
Andaya, 'The search for the "origins" of Melayu', JSEAS 32, 3 (2001): 315-30; Barnard, Multiple centres of authority; Timothy P.
van Groenendael, Rosemary Robson and the two anonymous JSEAS referees
JSEAS reviewers for their critical comments and suggestions on previous
JSEAS recognises this diversity, and will continue to provide a platform for the various perspectives that emerge.
I would like to thank my colleagues at MPI and the two anonymous JSEAS referees for their helpful comments, criticisms, and suggestions.