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This article focuses on the experience of an Infantry company conducting KLEs over the course of a year in Afghanistan.
"Influencing the Population: Using Interpreters, Conducing KLEs, and Executing 10 in Afghanistan" by CPT Michael Cummings (Infantry Magazine, May-August 2010).
This is another article from Infantry Magazine about effective TTPs for KLEs in Afghanistan.
Just trying to convey one idea to your counterpart can bring the KLE to a standstill.
Another reason a KLE will take longer than originally anticipated is that your counterpart will agree on a topic of discussion but have an ulterior motive and will direct the conversation in an entirely different direction.
Afghan officers can, and will, go into an extended monologue during a KLE, talking about not only the issue that prompted the KLE, but every other issue he may have at the time.
Our battalion referred to KLEs as any meeting with Afghans, locals, or security forces.
Second, I would like to caution against assuming that training at mobility readiness exercises (MREs) will adequately prepare a small unit leader to conduct KLEs downrange.
I also conducted joint KLEs with ANA soldiers and their Marine trainers at our FOB.
With Havoc Company elements typically conducting five to seven hours of movement to arrive at a population center, the need to make every minute of the KLE have lasting impact cannot be overstated.
After factoring in the number of villages deemed critical to maintain presence in and overlaying the 72-hour model, we discovered that we could effectively expect to conduct a KLE at most once every two weeks and at a minimum once a month in each of our villages of interest.
The KLE is the only tool that presents the opportunity to influence the population in this manner.