Kar

(redirected from King's African Rifles)
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AcronymDefinition
KarKarnataka (India)
KarKentucky Administrative Regulations
KarKaraoke File
KarKing's African Rifles
KarKirby Air Ride (game)
KarKainate Receptor (neuroscience)
KarKey Account Representative
KarKinematic Ambiguity Resolution
KarAlpha-Keto Acid Reductase
KarAromatic Alpha-Keto Acid Reductase
KarKey Accounting Requirement (US DoD)
References in periodicals archive ?
Parsons, The Rank-and-File: Social Implications of African Military Service in the King's African Rifles, 1902-1964 (Oxford: James Currey, 1999); Timothy H.
In 1962 Astles, who had just set up the first Ugandan airline to employ Africans, was close to drowning in the waters of Lake Victoria when the huge captain in the 4th King's African Rifles dived in and saved him.
After the president's injured hand is neatly bandaged by Nicholas and he realizes the heritage of his chance benefactor, Amin, who long served in the King's African Rifles, sings the praises of the Scottish, deeming them among the bravest fighters on Earth.
Robin Medley, 86, served with the King's African Rifles in World War Two, during which he helped liberate Abyssinia, now Ethiopia, from the Italian fascists.
While Uganda was still part of the British Empire, Amin joined the King's African Rifles as a private and ended up training in Stirling.
Tom Hickman was called up in 1958 and served as a second lieutenant with the King's African Rifles in Kenya.
Amin was a well-known figure in the British military and began his career in the King's African Rifles of the British colonial army in 1946.
Amin, who died aged 80 in a Saudi Arabian hospital, began his career in the King's African Rifles in 1946.
Amin was a well-known figure in the British army and began his career in the King's African Rifles of the British colonial army in 1946.
However, unlike the majority of the earlier studies that concentrated on the soldiers' political experience in both World War I and World War II, this book instead covers almost the entire period of colonial rule and emphasizes the social and economic experiences of the African soldiers in the British King's African Rifles (KAR).
The next day Lettow-Vorbeck was invited for coffee in the Mess by the Colonel of the King's African Rifles. At Abercorn, General Edwards, the local British commander treated him courteously and hospitably.
He felt that he should have been awarded a Victoria Cross while serving in the King's African Rifles before independence and was cross that he hadn't.