KISAR


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AcronymDefinition
KISARKodiak Island Search and Rescue (Kodiak, AK)
References in periodicals archive ?
Please do something," said Rania Kisar in her video appeal from Idlib to Trump.
Pols and Anderson address further complexities of archipelagic racialisation in their account of Rodenwaldfs research on the 'Mestizos of Kisar'.
However, Kisar, from Tenom, Sabah, requested to be allowed bail on grounds that his wife, who is not working, was pregnant with their second child.
Following which, the court allowed Kisar, who was unrepresented, bail of RM8,000 in one surety and ordered to surrender his passport, as well as to not intimidate the witness.
Once it actually makes it inside Syria another 20 percent gets taken by the Local Councils because they feel that they have a right to payment in kind, they also have families," Kisar said.
Similarly, reporting these incidents to the police in Kisar is a futile business given the time delays and the uncertainty of a response.
Elkington, a champion of white settlement in tropical Australia, also visited Kisar, entranced by the 'romantic tale' that Brown had woven around it.
The book includes twenty-one texts, distributed as follows: three texts on the settlement history of Hispar; two on the agricultural year and systems of time reckoning, including discussions of major festivals; fifteen texts on spirit beliefs and the shamanic cult; and one three-part narrative consisting of episodes in the Kisar cycle.
(3) See also the Oirata language of Kisar Island off the north-east coast of Timor in J.P.B.
When the primordial state of undifferentiated unity (Apsu = Mummu + Tiamat, "[plus or minus]0"), in which nothing existed, came to an end, nothingness was replaced by the binary system of oppositions (Lahmu and Lahamu) and the infinite universe (Ansar = Assur) with its negative counterpart (Kisar).
(18) Indeed in some origin stories this putative common origin and brotherhood is extended to an inter-island sphere, which includes the islands of Flores, Kisar, Alor, and Ambon in eastern Indonesia.
Money, the subject of Sandra Pannell's chapter, is a resource in short supply and endowed with quasi-magical powers on the island of Kisar. When supplied in the form of presidential grants for local development projects, but without adequate management systems its effects on local natural and social resources are not always benefic ial.