LASCH

AcronymDefinition
LASCHLocal Authority Secure Children's Home (UK)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lasch's characterization of the elite's low regard for the masses calls to mind Hillary Clinton's put-down of Donald Trump supporters during the 2016 presidential race.
Ms Lasch said: "When I looked at the back of his hair I could tell it was not a hairdresser cutting it.
Cayo en mis manos un poco por azar y otro por curiosidad un libro del sociologo e historiador, con mucho de psicologo, el norteamericano Christopher Lasch (1932-1994), con un extrano titulo: Refugio de un mundo despiadado (1979) (1).
Only twenty years ago, Lasch could, with considerable justification, point to the lived experience of limits as the conservative core of America, in contrast to the fundamentally similar lifestyle shared by the coastal elites of both parties.
Writing about sport and the culture industry in the United States, Lasch claimed that the first stage of play becoming an object of mass consumption began with the establishment of 'big time' athletes in universities as early as I878.
One interesting aspect of Le desert is Garcia's obvious familiarity with English-language sources: Lasch is referred to frequently, as are Bertrand Russell, George Orwell, Noam Chomsky and even William Morris.
The tablescape for the 125-person dinner, inspired by Girard-Perregaux's Neo-Tourbillon, was designed by Aranda Lasch in collaboration with Neal Feay.
Psychoanalytic concepts were common parlance in the mid-twentieth century, Lunbeck notes; cultural critics such as Tom Wolfe, Peter Marin, and Christopher Lasch adapted the scholarship about narcissism for a readership already primed by decades of pop Freudianism.
And in 1979, the University of Rochester professor Christopher Lasch, a skeptical populist historian of progressivism, used the concept of "narcissism," first hinted at by Freud in a series of essays written on the eve of the First World War, to capture the emptiness of American life in the aftermath of the 1960s.
Ken Lasch, a retired priest of the Paterson, N.J., diocese; Fr.