LIBOR


Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to LIBOR: Euribor
AcronymDefinition
LIBORLondon Interbank Offered Rate
LIBORLong Island Board of Realtors (New York)
LIBORLittle Investment Bankers of Rutgers (New Jersey)
Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Libor, short for London interbank offered rate, is a benchmark calculated from quotes by banks used to price contracts worth over $300 trillion (PS240 trillion).
Sal Crifasi, president of the newly formed Chapter, added, "With the recent MLS Regionalization between LIBOR and Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors, the need for stronger professional collaboration is vital to insure our future success.
This trend continues despite LIBOR being the most commonly used index for U.S.
In the U.S., the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY) convened the Alternative Reference Rates Committee (ARRC) to help select a LIBOR replacement.
A new LIBOR rate is published each business day, and the process is quite simple in theory.
The average of their responses is designated the London InterBank Offered Rate--or Libor. The process is applied for five different currencies, across seven different maturities from overnight to one year--giving a total of 35 separate Libor rates.
The FCA sounded Libor's death knell as regulators were still scrambling to settle on replacement rates.
"Libor is part of the financial infrastructure that supports the swap, loan and floating-rate bond industry.
Earlier, the head of Britain's financial markets watchdog had called for a substitute for the widely used Libor.
The London Interbank Offered Rate - or Libor - has been steeped in financial scandal, but remains crucial for calculating the interest rates on household mortgages or loans for some big businesses.
Managers at Barclays told Libor submitters during the financial crisis to lower their Libor setting so the bank did not appear "in financial difficulty" and would not need to pay more than its rivals to borrow money, New York's attorney general said.