LUDD


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AcronymDefinition
LUDDLaboratoires, Usines, Déchets et Démantèlement (French: Laboratories, Plants, Waste and Demolition)
References in classic literature ?
One of the stories in The Mabinogion, the story of King Ludd, takes us back a long way.
"King Ludd," we are told in The Mabinogion, "ruled prosperously and rebuilt the walls of London, and encompassed it about with numberless towers.
Now, although Ludd was such a wise king, three plagues fell upon the island of Britain.
The story goes on to tell how good King Ludd freed the island of Britain from all three plagues and lived in peace all the days of his life.
New Wave indie band Shambolic was the first from Huddersfield to play at the Le Bar'Ouf in Cholet under the project this month while Ludd have already played in Huddersfield.
In case you have been living in a cave reading a biography of Ned Ludd (he of Luddites fame), the Internet of Things allows machines to communicate with each other; in the case of smart meters, this communication ability allows electrical utilities to better balance energy supply and demand during peak and off-peak times, thus reducing overall consumption and lowering utility bills.
But the chefs that Lane Selman knew, including such Portland stars as Jason "Ned Ludd" French, never dreamed that they could help retool the fruits and vegetables that farmers were growing.
Ever since Ned Ludd unleashed his anger on a pair of unsuspecting stocking frames at the end of the 18th Century, machines have made frontline factory workers more than a little jittery.
William Mole would be in Ludd when news of the Armistice filtered through in November 1918.
She is from Anstey in Leicestershire, whose other famous residents have included Ned Ludd (the original Luddite), snooker player Willie Thorne and legendary Wolves footballer Derek Dougan.
Because Pynchon is a self-proclaimed Luddite, we should recall that the followers of King Ludd were textile craftsmen who opposed the introduction of the industrial looms that concentrated wealth in the hands of the factory owners and oppressed the working class.
In 1786, Ned Ludd made his mark in history by leading a protest against the adoption of new textile machinery in England's long-established woolen goods industry.