LJ

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LJLaser Jet (Hewlett Packard)
LJLive Journal (website/service)
LJLibrary Journal (periodical)
LJLjubljana, Slovenia (license plate)
LJLarry Johnson (basketball player)
LJLa Jolla
LJLoja (Portuguese: store; postal usage)
LJLong Jump
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LJLearning Journey (Singapore)
LJLord Justice
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LJLowenstein-Jensen
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LJLine Judge (football)
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LJLuke Jackson (NBA Player)
LJLight Jockey (gaming)
LJLichtjahr (German: lightyear)
LJLapse in Judgment
LJLaskar Jihad (Indonesian terrorist group)
LJLos Juimos (Chilean slang: off we go)
LJLewiston Journal
LJLegendary Jedi (Dark Forces 2: Jedi Knight Clan)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, regional scholar bureaucrats like Jusuf Wanandi of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Jakarta maintained that "attention to such groups as Laskar Jihad has been overblown.
(7.) Jafar's account of Laskar Jihad's withdrawal from Poso as a result of the security forces sufficiently providing security for Muslims may be ex post rationalization, as Laskar Jihad disbanded after the September 11 attacks drew intense pressure on the Indonesian government to crack down on Islamic extremist groups.
In Indonesia, such criminal gangs include the Islamic Defenders Front (IDF) and Laskar Jihad, the latter being responsible for the upsurge of communal violence in the Moluccas in recent years.
Things went from bad to worse in Ambon when a radical fundamentalist Muslim group known as Laskar Jihad (Islamic Militia), sent 2,000 young fighters to the area with the collusion of the army.
Jafar, 41, who led the now-disbanded Laskar Jihad paramilitary group, was arrested in May last year after addressing a rally in Ambon, the capital of Maluku Province, where fighting between Christians and Muslims has claimed thousands of lives since early 1999.
An indigenous ally in indonesia, Laskar Jihad, seeks the expulsion of all Christians.
Hardline Islamic group Laskar Jihad will also be investigated along with Jemaah Islamiah (Islamic Community), another group accused of plotting attacks on American targets in Singapore.
And the leader of another group, Laskar Jihad, is led by Jafar Umar Thalib, who fought against the Soviets in Afghanistan.
Groups such as Laskar Jihad, Laskar Hisbullah, Hizbut Tahrir, and Jamaah Mujahiddin, for example, follow the scripturalist line in dealing with non-Muslim communities.
Two years of fighting - fuelled by the presence of the paramilitary Islamic group Laskar Jihad - have left 1,000 dead and thousands more displaced.
Several groups are often cited as having links to Al Qaeda, including the Islamic Defenders Front, whose members threatened to kick Americans out of Indonesia with "sweeps." (The threats, though widely reported, were empty: As Joe Saunders of Human Rights Watch notes, "No one was ever swept away.") Another group, Laskar Jihad (Holy Warriors), has sent men to wage war in Maluku and Poso in central Sulawese, both sites of bloody Muslim-Christian riots.
While not all Muslims adhere to anti-Christian ideas, the Laskar Jihad, a Muslim paramilitary group, is targeting Christians on the Maluku Islands of Indonesia.