LOOP

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AcronymDefinition
LOOPLife on Other Planets (Supergrass album)
LOOPLoss Of Offsite Power
LOOPLaw of One Price (finance, economics)
LOOPLouisiana Offshore Oil Port, Inc.
LOOPListed on Other Page (online marketplaces)
LOOPLong-Range Open Ocean Patrol
LOOPLeaders of Oak Park (Kansas City, MO)
LOOPLifeline of Ohio Organ Procurement Agency (Columbus, OH)
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References in periodicals archive ?
PPP rests on assumptions, chiefly that the law of one price must hold for part of the purchases being compared.
Nevertheless, theorists have tried to apply the idea of the same good being similarly priced across countries, most notably in the Law of One Price. It was championed by Cassell (1918, 1916).
In this case, both currencies are equally used in international markets, and the law of one price (LOOP) holds perfectly for both types of goods.
Second, I test the law of one price by testing restrictions on risk prices across factor portfolios and EREIT portfolio.
By the law of one price, which is enforced through arbitrage, if two assets are equivalent they will tend to have the same market price.
For example, it raised questions about the applicability of the law of one price, it coincided with a period of extraordinary house price volatility, and it witnessed changing patterns of asset demand on the part of households and financial institutions alike.
This resembles the law of one price where prices for a well-defined product traded in two separate geographic markets should constitute a single integrated geographic market.
Adjusted comparable prices and the law of one price
Among the topics are empirical evidence on the theory of non-renewable resource economics, bioeconomics: nature as capital, biological resistance, the spatial economics of forest conservation, water institutions and the law of one price, and transboundary water issues.
An alternative approach, based on cointegration analysis techniques, has been developed and used to test for causality, market integration and the so called "Law of One Price" (Asche et al., 2004)
Seigniorage benefits are significant-for example, the US has enjoyed a higher rate of return on its assets held abroad than it has had to pay foreigners on their dollar assets for every single quarter since 1960-defying the law of one price. It is not a prize to be given up lightly.