LOHS

(redirected from Length of Hospital Stay)
AcronymDefinition
LOHSLoss of Heat Sink
LOHSLake Oswego High School (Lake Oswego, OR)
LOHSLocal Order Handling System
LOHSLength of Hospital Stay
LOHSLive Oak High School (Morgan Hill, California)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The parameter that significantly prolonged the length of hospital stay was prior abdominal surgery (p 2 days were considered to have a prolonged length of hospital stay.
The mean length of hospital stay was 31.56[+ or -]15.91 (16-95) days, and the mean follow-up duration was 29.72[+ or -]27.81 (1-99) months.
The average length of hospital stay for each patient was 23, 14, and 9 days for the slow, intermediate and fast walkers, respectively.
The forest plot of comparison for the length of hospital stay is presented in Figure 2 (10).
The basic medical history data (length of hospital stay and type of nutritional support) were obtained from available medical records.
Prolonged ileus, wound infection and length of hospital stay between the two groups were compared.
Additionally, length of hospital stay was decreased by 12.6% and time spent in the intensive care unit by 8% in vitamin C-treated patients in non-U.S.
The primary outcomes of the study were duration of treatment and reinfection or death in the first month of life, with a secondary outcome of length of hospital stay.
Average length of hospital stay varied from 15.6 days for supportive care, 24.3 days for surgical debridement, 17.4 days for IVIG, 11.5 for corticosteroids, 15.5 for cyclosporine, and 26.3 for biologies.
-- Average length of hospital stay across all DRGs varies by 3.9 days depending on the payment source, according to data recently released by Healthcare Knowledge Resources in Ann Arbor.
The study's primary outcomes were length of hospital stay, in-hospital mortality, and postoperative complications.
Ileus is frustrating for patients and providers alike, and its occurrence may prolong the length of hospital stay, increase the cost of care, worsen patient satisfaction, and potentially delay postoperative treatments, such as chemotherapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies.