LAV

(redirected from Light armored vehicle)
AcronymDefinition
LAVLavatory
LAVLicenciatura en Artes Visuales (Spanish: Bachelor of Visual Arts; México)
LAVLight Armored Vehicle
LAVLike A Virgin (song)
LAVLeast Absolute Value (estimator)
LAVLos Angeles Valley (California)
LAVLymphadenopathy-Associated Virus
LAVLeisure Activity Vehicle
LAVLegacy Audio Visual
LAVLandesk Application Virtualization
LAVLivermore-Amador Valley (California)
LAVLoad Average
LAVLight Assault Vehicle
LAVLight Amphibious Vehicle
LAVLate Avestan (linguistics)
LAVLive Attenuated Vaccine/Virus
LAVLaunch Axis Vertical
LAVLifting Ascent Vehicle
LAVLatch Valve
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, if all is quiet in Bahrain, would Saudi Arabia be interested in buying as many light armored vehicles from Canada?
Oregon National Guard A light armored vehicle similar to this one was used in a drug raid of Eugene homes on Oct.
The Army has a contract with a subsidiary of General Motors to produce 2,131 light armored vehicles over the next five to six years, at a cost of nearly $4 billion.
The light armored vehicle, Howeize, and Talaeiyeh armored infantry carrier were officially unveiled in a ceremony attended by Iranian Defense Minister Brigadier General Ahmad Vahidi.
Unlike the four-wheeled humvee, the light armored vehicle has eight wheels with different suspensions on the rear and forward wheels.
The Army announced the purchase of 2,131 Light Armored Vehicles, known as LAV III, from GM/General Dynamics Land Systems.
Yesterday, Iran unveiled a light armored vehicle and an armored personnel carrier as part of its broader plan for increasing mobility of its armed forces.
The DGA is currently working on a replacement for the French Army's AMX 10RC light armored vehicle: a new 18-ton vehicle called the Engin Blinde a Roues de Contact (EBRC, or Wheeled Armored Vehicle for Contact), the heart of the BOA concept.
Military and law enforcement organizations in the United States and elsewhere are acquiring a light armored vehicle that is mounted on a Ford F550 commercial chassis.
A related system offered by the company is a tactical DF system which operates in the HF/VHF/UHF band and is housed in the smaller Otokar AKREP light armored vehicle. The DFINT-3T system is capable of locating and exploiting frequency-hopping and burst-mode communications signals.
Planned upgrades to the Light Armored Vehicle and the Abrams tank, as well as an update on the new Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, are part of a special story package beginning on page 30.
That includes 80 percent of the infantry battalions, 100 percent of the tank battalions, 100 percent of the light armored vehicle battalions, 100 percent of the amphibious assault vehicle battalions, 100 percent of the Harrier squadrons and 70 percent of the Hornet squadrons.
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