LPCD

(redirected from Litres per Capita per Day)
AcronymDefinition
LPCDLitres per Capita per Day (India)
LPCDLinha Privativa Para Comunicação de Dados (Portuguese: Private Line for Data Communication)
LPCDLothian Primary and Community Division (National Health Service; UK)
LPCDLocal Promoters for Cultural Diversity (UK)
References in periodicals archive ?
Water supply is reported to be in the range of 35 litres per capita per day in Robertsonpet to 106 lpcd in Ranebennur.
Current water demand stands at 550 litres per capita per day, which is more than 10 times the allowance for a person in cities such as Cape Town, and more than double the international average.
Going back to the example of Cape Town, currently water is rationed at 50 litres per capita per day. At the same time, in the UAE, we use 550 litres per capita per day -- more than 10 times the allowance for a person in Cape Town, and more than double the world average.
"Basic access is considered to be achieved where up to to 20 litres per capita per day is available within one kilometre or 30 minutes round trip," he said.
AaAaAeAcAaAaAeAaAaAaAeAcAaAaAeAaAaAaAeA 77% of the habitations in rural areas have access t 40 Litres Per Capita per Day (LPCD) of water supply.
12 towns of N-E States have been included in the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation for Urban Transformation (AMRUT) for providing water taps to all urban households besides improving water supply to the normative level of 135 litres per capita per day, expanding sewerage and drainage networks, promoting non-motorised transport and development of open spaces in mission cities.
George and Mount Pleasant water supply systems to arrive at an average residential water consumption rate of 256 litres per capita per day for 2011.
The average annual rain measures about 74mm while the consumption per capita is among the highest in the world at 675 litres per capita per day, about double or triple the amount consumed in Western countries or Japan.
"Iraq's average water production level per person, at 327 litres per capita per day, is considered high by international standards, but around half of that water is lost to seepage, leakage and wastage due to system inefficiencies." the statement continued.