LHBT

(redirected from Long Head of the Biceps Tendon)
AcronymDefinition
LHBTLong Head of the Biceps Tendon (orthopedics)
LHBTLactose Hydrogen Breath Test
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References in periodicals archive ?
The quantitative measurement for calculating the signal intensity of the healing tissue was defined as the signal-to-noise quotient (SNQ), where LHBT is the long head of the biceps tendon.
Despite an evolving understanding of the anatomy of and pathologies that affect the long head of the biceps tendon, controversy still remains within the orthopaedic literature with respect to the appropriate management of its disorders.
MRI revealed significant fluid collection in the bicipital groove surrounding the long head of the biceps tendon and a subchondral lesion in the greater tuberosity of the humerus suggestive of a cyst.
Lesions of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) are a common cause of pain and functional impairment of the shoulder [4-7].
The biceps brachii muscle is one of the most diverse in the human body; however, congenital absence of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare anomaly [1-7].
Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium.
SLAP lesions refer to a tear of the superior labrum (11-to-1 o'clock position), typically at the origin of the long head of the biceps tendon and might extend into the labrum anteriorly or posteriorly and into the adjacent structures.
This region is commonly called the biceps anchor as it is the position where the long head of the biceps tendon originates.
Just lateral to the bicipital groove and long head of the biceps tendon, a 3 to 5cm trough was created at the insertion site using a burr.
A portion of the rotator interval tissue and superior capsule was partially excised in order to visualize the intraarticular portion of the long head of the biceps tendon. Care was taken to preserve the bicipital sling during dissection to prevent iatrogenic subluxation of the LHB.
There was mild fluid in the tendon sheath around each bifid branch of the long head of the biceps tendon, which made it easier to appreciate the split.