LTCA

(redirected from Long-Term Care Administration)
AcronymDefinition
LTCALong-Term Care Administration
LTCALong Term Corrective Action
LTCALong Term Care Aide
LTCALuCille Tack Center for the Arts (Spencer, WI)
LTCALake Talon Conservation Association (Rutherglen, ON, Canada)
LTCALouisiana Tech Concert Association
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References in periodicals archive ?
NAB has developed standards for college-level programs in long-term care administration and accredits those colleges and universities that meet the standards.
With increased exposure to such hazards has come the question for many as to whether long-term care administration is what they want to do as their life's work.
Saint Joseph's College of Maine also has a long-term care administration program through its Long-Term Care Management Institute, offering a certificate (Table 2) and bachelor's degree in long-term care administration, in addition to a master's in health services administration.
"We've been able to double the number of students in the long-term care administration program." And experienced people already in long-term care are far from being written off.
Salentijn, also of the lean and athletic prototype that seems to characterize long-term care administration in The Netherlands, walked me about the facility, darting from one room to another and proudly showing me the relaxed pace at which staff moved about.
The foundation has conducted research on matters relating to long-term care administration, such as the use of physician extenders in nursing homes, an action guide for addressing wandering behavior among residents, two administrator salary surveys and a study of Level A compliance decision making.
By the way, concerning the publications we offer - the Journal of Long-Term Care Administration, The Long-Term Care Administrator and College Notes - we are considering refocusing our communications channels more on administrators' specific concerns in such areas as strategic leadership, career growth and future management trends.
Colleges are responding to these new educational needs, as well - in our case, we're dividing our long-term care administration program into three tracks: nursing home, assisted living and home health care.
Skills here, of course, go beyond traditional long-term care administration and enter the private market realms of market analysis, cost analysis, competitive pricing, marketing, staff development and contract negotiations.
To do this, we need a series of objective standards that explore whether we, as nursing home administrators, qualify for acceptance into a new definitional category - whether, in short, long-term care administration is evolving from a "job" to a "profession." The answer revolves around two basic questions: "What does it mean to be classified as a profession?" and "Does long-term care administration qualify?"
In long-term care administration our knowledge base has become extensive and is continuing to grow.
What began, for the author, as a term paper for a long-term care administration class grew into a unique opportunity for us to view our residents, facility, staff and quality of care from a new, much more objective perspective.
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