LCOSS

(redirected from Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite)
AcronymDefinition
LCOSSLunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (US NASA)
LCOSSLead Computing Optical Sight System
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References in periodicals archive ?
Building on the findings of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) missions that proved the existence of water on the Moon, Resource Prospector planned to take the next step and harvest resources.
Expert presenters will discuss the latest results from the LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter), the LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) and the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) programs as well as the Luna and Resource Prospector missions.
A previous NASA satellite, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), discovered water ice when it impacted in 2009, the space agency said.
"LCROSS (Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite) saw significant amounts of mercury, but the LCROSS site was at the bottom of the Moon's Cabeus crater, which hasn't seen sunlight for more than a billion years and is therefore extremely cold," he added.
The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite ( LCROSS) had hurtled a spent rocket into a dark crater -- Cabeus -- in a permanently shadowed region on the moon's South Pole in October last year.
What became the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) started its mission smoothly enough.
(LCROSS stands for Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite.)
The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite was fired into the lunar crust on October 9.
<div class="imageBox" style="width: 598px;"><img id="7424" class="imgPhoto" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/articles/full/2009/11/13/7424.jpg" alt="This artist's rendering released by NASA shows the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite as it crashed into the moon to test for the presence of water last month.
But Aowe got spectrometer data and thatAAEs what really matters.AoSpectrometers are adept at breaking down the light from the collision to reveal what chemical compounds were present in the debris kicked up by the crash, if any.The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite launched in June with the goal of finding out whether water ice might lie hidden at the bottom of polar craters on the moon that havenAAEt seen sunlight in billions of years.
Pictures of the crash were supposed to be beamed by the second probe Lcross - short for Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite. It had five cameras aboard plus measuring kit.
The crashing spacecraft consisted of a Moon-mapping orbiter, LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) and a 2.2 tonne empty Centaur rocket.