MARK


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
MARKMicrotubule Affinity Regulating Kinase (neuropathology)
MaRKManaging Requirements Knowledge (IEEE conference)
MARKMid-Atlantic Ridge at the Kane Fracture Zone
MARKMaintenance & Reliability Kit
MARKMechanized Accounting and Record Keeping (GE)
MARKMoultrie Amateur Radio Klub (Moultrie, IL)
References in classic literature ?
I knew, for Uncle Mark had told me, that his name was Jonas Blake, that he was a Theological Student from St.
Of twenty-four arrows, shot in succession, ten were fixed in the target, and the others ranged so near it, that, considering the distance of the mark, it was accounted good archery.
It is a mark that I have found before now," answered the young bowman.
The Mark Boat signals we must attend to the derelict, now whistling her death-song, as she falls beneath us in long sick zigzags.
By this time the old hunter was ready for his business, and throwing his right leg far behind him, and stretching his left arm along the barrel of his piece, he raised it toward the bird, Every eye glanced rapidly from the marks man to the mark; but at the moment when each ear was expecting the report of the rifle, they were disappointed by the ticking sound of the flint.
She said that a thousand and a thousand people had met him here, and had written in his book, and have his mark on them.
Another mark of substance is that it has no contrary.
I scored the bit about the Child with my pencil, and put a morsel of paper for a mark to keep the place; "Lie you there," I said, "till the marriage of Mr.
The mousing man, who bore the name of Marks, instantly stopped his sipping, and, poking his head forward, looked shrewdly on the new acquaintance, as a cat sometimes looks at a moving dry leaf, or some other possible object of pursuit.
I have several such dried bits, which I use for marks in my whale-books.
Every human being carries with him from his cradle to his grave certain physical marks which do not change their character, and by which he can always be identified--and that without shade of doubt or question.
Since the objects of imitation are men in action, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type (for moral character mainly answers to these divisions, goodness and badness being the distinguishing marks of moral differences), it follows that we must represent men either as better than in real life, or as worse, or as they are.