MCLG

AcronymDefinition
MCLGMaximum Contaminant Level Goal(s)
MCLGMy Child Loss Grief
MCLGMid-Continent Light Goose (wildlife designation)
MCLGMaximum Containment Level Guide
References in periodicals archive ?
The MCLG for lead in water is 0 parts per billion (ppb), but the action level for lead under the Lead and Copper Rule, discussed below, is 15 ppb.
See SCHEBERLE, supra note 1, at 129 ("These guidelines are not enforceable by EPA" [and] MCL is set as close to the MCLG as 'feasible.
For lead, then, the EPA would be expected to set its MCL as close as "feasible" (economically and technologically) to the MCLG of zero, except if it was not "feasible" to ascertain the level of lead contamination (and no one urged that the task of ascertainment was not feasible).
An MCLG is the concentration at which a chemical is believed to pose no adverse health risks.
68) This is the practical standard, and it is as close to the MCLG as possible, given technology and cost limitations.
139) For lead, the EPA's MCLG was zero, because no safe threshold had been established.
The court said EPA's December 1998 rule adopting a zero MCLG for chloroform was "arbitrary and capricious, and excess of statutory authority.
Within two years of enactment, EPA is required to issue regulations requiring public water systems to mail to each consumer annually a report which includes: information on the source of the water purveyed; definitions of the terms "maximum contaminant level goal" (MCLG) and "maximum contaminant level" (MCL); the MCLG, the MCL, and the level of any contaminant detected in the drinking water and the health concerns that resulted in the regulation of any contaminant for which there was a violation during the year; information on compliance with drinking water regulations; and, information on levels of unregulated contaminant for which monitoring is required.
Within two years of enactment, EPA is required to issue regulations requiring public water systems to publish in one or more local newspapers and mail to each consumer annually a report which includes: information on the source of the water purveyed; definitions of the terms "maximum contaminant level goal" (MCLG) and "maximum contaminant level" (MCL); the MCLG, the MCL, and the level of any contaminant detected in the drinking water and the health concerns that resulted in the regulation of any contaminant for which there was a violation during the year; information on compliance with drinking water regulations; and, information on levels of unregulated contaminants for which monitoring is required.
The other constraint used routinely by EPA on how low MCLs an be set, until the MCLG is reached, is the practical quantitation level (PQL).
Maximum Contaminant Levels are required by law to be set as close to the MCLG as is technologically feasible.
MCLGs allow for a margin of safety and are non-enforceable public health goals.