MEANS


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Related to MEANS: means test, Means to an End
AcronymDefinition
MEANSMaking Employment a New Success (North Carolina)
MEANSMaterials Engineering for Affordable New Systems (Air Force Office of Scientific Research)
MEANSMarin Emergency Automated Notification System (San Anselmo, CA)
MEANSMinneapolis Equal Access Network Services
References in classic literature ?
A single word, accordingly, is by no means simple it is a class of similar series of movements (confining ourselves still to the spoken word).
'When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean--neither more nor less.'
For he certainly does not mean, as we were now saying that I ought to return a return a deposit of arms or of anything else to one who asks for it when he is not in his right senses; and yet a deposit cannot be denied to be a debt.
In bourgeois society, living labour is but a means to increase accumulated labour.
That seems descriptive enough, but still it is not exact enough for a German; so he precedes the word with that article which indicates that the creature to follow is feminine, and writes it down thus: "die Engla"nderinn,"--which means "the she-Englishwoman." I consider that that person is over-described.
I apologized; but he continued scornfully, "Since you are impervious to argument, you shall hear with your ears how by means of my two voices I reveal my shape to my Wives, who are at this moment six thousand miles seventy yards two feet eight inches away, the one to the North, the other to the South.
What women mean by "trusting" might afford a subject for an interesting disquisition.
He was one day engaged with Mr Allworthy in a discourse on charity: in which the captain, with great learning, proved to Mr Allworthy, that the word charity in Scripture nowhere means beneficence or generosity.
There are, again, some arts which employ all the means above mentioned, namely, rhythm, tune, and metre.
[1309a] if office brought no profit; by which means both the rich and the poor will enjoy what they desire; for to admit all to a share in the government is democratical; that the rich should be in office is aristocratical.
I conceived of its effect then, but I conceived of it as a misfortune, a fatality; now I am by no means sure that it was so; hereafter the creation of beauty, as we call it, for beauty's sake, may be considered something monstrous.
In the present task I have not got beyond this:--I am bent on finding Lizzie, and I mean to find her, and I will take any means of finding her that offer themselves.