MISTER


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AcronymDefinition
MISTERMentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role (teacher recruitment program)
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References in classic literature ?
The great god, Mister Haggin, had raged up and down the plantation.
As an instance, this very morning Biddy, remembering a secret mauling at the hands of Lerumie, laid teeth into his naked calf and threw him sprawling into the water, trade-box, earthly possessions and all, and then laughed at him, sure in the protection of Mister Haggin who grinned at the episode.
Bush-dogs were dogs--he recognized them as his kind; but they were somehow different from his own lordly breed, different and lesser, just as the blacks were compared with Mister Haggin, Derby, and Bob.
Like a lioness, when the cook-boy had struck him with a stick to drive him out of the kitchen, had Biddy sprung upon the black, receiving without wince or whimper one straight blow from the stick, and then downing him and mauling him among his pots and pans until dragged (for the first time snarling) away by the unchiding Mister Haggin, who; however, administered sharp words to the cook- boy for daring to lift hand against a four-legged dog belonging to a god.
He possessed a dim, vague, imperative knowingness that it was not merely not good, but supremely disastrous, leading to the mistily glimpsed sense of utter endingness for a dog, for any dog, to go into the water where slipped and slid and noiselessly paddled, sometimes on top, sometimes emerging from the depths, great scaly monsters, huge-jawed and horribly-toothed, that snapped down and engulfed a dog in an instant just as the fowls of Mister Haggin snapped and engulfed grains of corn.
Out of the unknown, from the somewhere and something else, too unconditional for him to know any of the conditions, instantly they appeared, full-statured, walking about Meringe Plantation with loin-cloths about their middles and bone bodkins through their noses, and being put to work by Mister Haggin, Derby, and Bob.
'What do you suspect me of, Mister Jarsper?' he asks, with drunken displeasure.
'Don't hurt the boy, Mister Jarsper,' urges Durdles, shielding him.
Oh what a worthy man he is, Mister Copperfield, but how imprudent he has been!'
- I remember once they wanted to cut off my head on the road to Lhassa.(No, I have never reached to Lhassa.) I sat down and cried, Mister O'Hara, anticipating Chinese tortures.
"I'll choose my own time, mister. You can leave the time to me.
"See here, mister, you can't expect me, as Bodymaster, to pass into the lodge a man for whose past he can't answer."