MLHFQ

AcronymDefinition
MLHFQMinnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (University of Minnesota)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of the secondary outcomes, including LVEF, LVEDD, plasma NT-proBNP level, NYHA classification, 6MWD, and MLHFQ scores, was performed using Student's t -test at week 12.
The NYHA class was assessed, and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) was completed.
The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) measures the total score of HRQOL and two separate dimensions of HRQOL: (a) the physical state of the patient and (b) the mental state of the patient.
No significant differences in HRQOL between groups were found (Cider et al 2003, Cider et al 2012) but Cider (2003) and Municino (2006) found significant improvements in total scores from baseline using the disease-specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ).
Significantly improved MLHFQ total score, but not more than controls Cider Improved (2012) V[O.sup.2peak] and 6MWT compared to controls (p < .01) No significant between-group differences in HRQOL outcomes Mourot et Significantly al (2010) improved V[O.sub.2peak] from baseline (p < .05) Municino et Significant al (2006) improvements in 6MWT, V[O.sub.2peak] and MLHFQ from baseline (p < .05).
At 12 weeks, significant improvements were seen in scores on the MLHFQ, Profile of Mood States (total mood disturbance, depression, and vigor subscales), and Cardiac Exercise Self-Efficacy Instrument in the tai chi group, compared with the heart health education group.
Tai chi patients without implanted cardioverter defibrillators devices, those with NYHA class I1 and III symptoms, and those with a non-ischemic etiology of HF improved significantly on the MLHFQ, compared with education-only patients.
At 12 weeks, significant improvements were seen in scores on the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ), Profile of Mood States (total mood disturbance, depression, and vigor subscales), and Cardiac Exercise Self-Efficacy Instrument in the tai chi group, compared with the heart health education group.
Major Finding: Patients with chronic systolic heart failure who participated in twice-weekly tai chi classes for 12 weeks improved their median MLHFQ scores by 19 points, whereas those enrolled in a control group experienced no change.