MOON


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Related to MOON: full moon, Moon calendar
AcronymDefinition
MOONMediterranean Operational Oceanography Network (EU)
MOONMPLS (Multi-Protocol Label Switching) Over OTN (Optical Transport Network) Network
MOONMulticenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network
MOONMinnesota Organization Of Numismatists
MOONMandolin Orchestra of Niagara (Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada)
MOONMoving Out of Neighborhood
MOONMeeting Our Operating Needs
References in classic literature ?
What place will the moon occupy in the heavens at the moment of the projectile's departure?
at the instant that the attraction of the moon exactly counterpoises that of the earth; that is to say at 47/52 of its passage.
In point of fact, in its apogee the moon is 247,552 miles, and in its perigee, 218,657 miles only distant; a fact which makes a difference of 28,895 miles, or more than one-ninth of the entire distance.
A Frenchman, an enthusiastic Parisian, as witty as he was bold, asked to be enclosed in the projectile, in order that he might reach the moon, and reconnoiter this terrestrial satellite.
Consequently, their arrival on the lunar disc could not take place until the 5th of December at twelve at night, at the exact moment when the moon should be full, and not on the
the detonation produced by the Columbiad, had the immediate effect of troubling the terrestrial atmosphere, by accumulating a large quantity of vapor, a phenomenon which excited universal indignation, for the moon was hidden from the eyes of the watchers for several nights.
The engagement given, he of the White Moon wheeled about, and making obeisance to the viceroy with a movement of the head, rode away into the city at a half gallop.
cat-like doth the moon come along, and dishonestly.
That would be the dearest thing to me"--thus doth the seduced one seduce himself,--"to love the earth as the moon loveth it, and with the eye only to feel its beauty.
We see the sinking moon," answered the spokesman of the party.
Now tell me, can any mortal man put out that moon before her hour of setting, and bring the curtain of black night down upon the land?
The nights are either brilliantly illumined or very dark, for if neither of the two moons of Mars happen to be in the sky almost total darkness results, since the lack of atmosphere, or, rather, the very thin atmosphere, fails to diffuse the starlight to any great extent; on the other hand, if both of the moons are in the heavens at night the surface of the ground is brightly illuminated.