MPIDR

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AcronymDefinition
MPIDRMax Planck Institute for Demographic Research (Germany)
References in periodicals archive ?
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research researcher Kai Willfuhr said that they are now able to prove that the Cinderella effect is not an inevitable reflex of stepparents.
The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Germany found that the birth rate in 28 European countries dropped as unemployment rose.
Oskar Burger of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, and colleagues analyzed previously gathered data on chimpanzees, modern hunter-gatherer societies in parts of Africa and South America, and people in the Human Mortality Database for Japan, Sweden and France.
University of California, Berkeley (USA), and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (Germany).
Caswell traveled to the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, where he addressed questions about human aging by analyzing the evolution of many life history traits across a wide range of organisms.
Boys are reaching physical and sexual maturity earlier than ever, report researchers at Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. A similar trend has already been identified among girls.
Rachel Margolis, a PhD candidate in demography and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, and demographer Mikko Myrskyla of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, scrutinized the self-rated happiness of more than 200,000 people from 86 countries and concluded that the story of parental happiness is far from straightforward.
Elo, University of Pennsylvania; Pekka Martikainen, University of Helsinki; and Mikko Myrskyla, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
"In terms of the probability you'll live through the year, it's astronomical the improvement that we've made," Discovery News quoted Oskar Burger, an evolutionary anthropologist at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany as saying.
About one-third of women under 30 in their first union between 1987 and 1994 broke off their relationships, according to research published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. That percentage is up from 31% for women in their first union between 1980 and 1986.
The strength of the new link is "surprising and intriguing," remarks psychologist Heiner Maier of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany.
Most parents who have any preference at all about the gender of their children tend to want an equal mix, according to Karsten Hank and Hans-Peter Kohler of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany.