M/S

(redirected from Miles Per Second)
AcronymDefinition
M/SMeter(s) per Second
M/SModeling and Simulation
M/SMail Stop (postal abbreviation)
M/SMilestone
M/SMaster/Slave
M/SMessieurs (plural of Mister)
M/Smiles per second
M/SMinesweeping
M/SMotor Ship
M/SMiniature Sheet (of stamps)
M/SMessage Switch
M/SMonths After Sight
M/SMedia and Status
References in periodicals archive ?
A 100-foot meteor hurtling at a speed of 9 miles per second detonates in the sky near the Podkamennaya Tunguska river in Siberia, Russia.
Dr Simon Gage, director of the Edinburgh International Science Festival, said: "In the few hours that revellers enjoy the Edinburgh's Hogmanay street party, the International Space Station, travelling at five miles per second, will orbit the Earth three times.
The Space Station has an international crew of six people, living and working while travelling at a speed of five miles per second, orbiting Earth every 90 minutes.
The solar winds that leave the Sun usually reach speeds of 250 miles per second and at the center of the corona can be as much as 500 miles per second!!
YOU, ME AND THE APOCALYPSE (SKY1, 9pm) A GIGANTIC comet is hurtling towards Earth at 27 miles per second, and it's going to obliterate everyone and everything in it in just 34 days.
Coronal material exploded from the sun at about 780 miles per second, arriving at Earth at 1:59 p.m.
The wind speed limit for the Sky Swing is 10 miles per second (m/s), as indicated by an electrical wind gauge in the control cabinet on the ride.
The big test will be for Philae to settle down safely as Rosetta and 67P zip towards the Sun at a breakneck 18 kilometres per second (11 miles per second), at a distance of 510 million kilometres (320 million miles) from Earth.
Light travels a mind-boggling 186,282 miles per second. While you may not be able to set up Ameristep's new Lightspeed ground blinds that quickly, it sort of feels that way.
The asteroid, named 2012 DA14, traveled at a speed of about eight miles per second.
When this happens, the small particles, most of which are no larger than a grain of sand, enter the earth's atmosphere at a high rate of speed (about 18 miles per second).