MLOC

(redirected from Million Lines of Code)
AcronymDefinition
MLOCMega Lines of Code
MLOCMemory Location
MLOCMillion Lines of Code
MLOCMidlands Lotus Owners Club (UK)
MLOCMitsubishi Lancer Owner Club (Malaysia)
MLOCMissing Logical or in Expression Used As Branch Condition (software fault)
MLOCMiddle Lane Owners Club (Lexus owners; UK)
MLOCMaster Pre-Light Off Checklist
MLOCMinimum Level Operational Capability
References in periodicals archive ?
Navigation and infotainment systems can require as much as 50 million lines of code in a vehicle today.
For instance, having 10 million lines of code running the entire system is not unheard of, and that is the same scale that is required to run Google's Android OS.
Consider the following: A modern car has 10 million lines of code. In the programming industry, there is an average of one bug per thousand lines of code.
Verification of the air-craft's 7 million lines of code is ongoing and should be completed by the end of the calendar year, she said.
Leading financial institutions develop several hundred million lines of code in-house for proprietary applications, and that is a competitive advantage for them.
Several large software projects exist in the range of 50 million lines of code, including Microsoft Windows and the entire code base of Facebook.
We pioneered this category and have spent a decade delivering nearly 400 man years of R&D, six million lines of code and millions of hours of operational deployment.
NREL participated in the software development for Intel's MIC architecture, and found that it took only a few days to port half a million lines of code using Intel Xeon Phi cores.
“A modern automobile can easily contain more than ten million lines of code,” stated Paul Anderson, GrammaTech's vice president of Engineering.
The remit of Coverity's solution has also expanded to include the software underpinning specific LHC experiments, which equates to 50 million lines of code. Coverity Static Analysis is now used by thousands of developers across CERN.
Working with IBM, GM researchers developed the Volt's 10 million lines of code and control systems in just 29 months.
The study comprised a total of 108 million lines of code. Using the data drawn from the automated analysis, CAST made a conservative estimate of which problems would be fixed and how much it would cost to fix them, revealing an average cost of nearly $2.82 per line of code.
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